Free Bitcoin Mining Earn Free Bitcoin Bitcoin Mining ...

What Escape From Tarkov really needs

submitted by Kingreptar97 to EscapefromTarkov [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Farming, Basic Arithmetic, and you

I have written this guide to dispel a common misconception I hear from this community - that putting more than one Graphics Card in your Bitcoin Farm is a great idea.
TLDR: The FIRST graphics card you put in your bitcoin farm generates a bitcoin every 20 hours. Every additional graphics card you put in your bitcoin farm generates a bitcoin every 333.33 hours. This information is misstated on the wiki and in many videos I've seen.
More Complicated Maths TLDR from u/Mekhazzio :
TLDR: The bitcoin farm has a base production rate that's much higher than the rate added by each additional graphics cards. So when investing, you shouldn't be looking at how fast the whole farm pays itself off, but how much time it takes your N>1 graphics cards to each pay for themselves, because otherwise you could have just been pocketing the pure profit from the base production rate the whole time.
At current therapist/flea-FiR values:
That is to say, adding a GPU to an already-running farm takes three weeks before you've stopped losing money on that GPU.

A pretty simple formula is utilized to determine Bitcoin Farming output. The payback period for your first graphics card is around 3 days. For each additional graphics card that you put in the payback period is over 20 days. The reason that this has confused so many people is that they credit the production from Graphics Card 1 to the payback period for the rest of the Graphics Cards.
Caveat 1: Escape from Tarkov is a video game and, at least for us players, not a business. Many video game players are completionists, and I will not begrudge anyone who wants to max out every single part of their hideout because it will feel like an achievement. This guide discusses the impact of bitcoin farming on your PMC's wallet. If you find utility in maxing out the bitcoin farm for the feeling of completion then you should do it and probably just close this guide and not worry about it.
Caveat 2: This guide will not address people who hatchet run or pistol run to put graphics cards in their secure container that will usually end up being non-FIR. There are too many variables (spawn rate, survival rate, replacement value of just doing normal Tarkov raids instead of hatchet runs) to do a decent analysis. If you end up with non-FIR graphics cards you should put them in your Bitcoin Farm.
Analysis:
The formula for bitcoin generation is as follows:
Let's simplify some unnecessary constants and make this look more like a normal mathematical function. All we have to do is multiply (1/49) * (0.15) to get this, which is equivalent and much easier to understand:
Now, let's get some ground rules for investment:
Caveat 3: Prices may change, blah blah blah, unless the IRL bitcoin market crashes the conclusions from this guide will still be accurate for the most part.
I will also note that I'm not going to include the cost for fuel needed for production. Because you can craft expeditionary fuel into mag boxes, as well as do other crafts on your workbench and med station while you have the power on, this cost is negligible. Furthermore, since my thesis is that putting more graphics cards in is not worth it, the fact is that I can prove this mathematically without even accounting for the entire cost category of fuel only strengthens my argument.
Using these assumed prices, let's take a look at some different cases.
Case 1:
Building a Bitcoin Generator and putting a single graphics card in.
To calculate cost, we add the cost of building the empty generator (300k) to the single graphics card (250k) to get 550k rouble investment.
Lets calculate revenue using our formula before:BTC Generated per Hour = 0.05 + 0.003 * (Graphics Cards - 1)BTC Generated per Hour = 0.05 + 0.003 * (1 Graphics Cards - 1)BTC Generated per Hour = 0.05 + 0.003 * (0)BTC Generated per Hour = 0.05
So we're generating 5% of a bitcoin every hour which means we'll get a bitcoin from our farm every 20 hours.
So, every 20 hours we are generating a product worth ~150k. Since we invested ~550k we need to sell:
550k investment / 150k roubles per bitcoin = 3.66 physical bitcoins in order to recoup our investment
Since we can't harvest bitcoins until they are full, we actually need to wait until we get 4 bitcoins at which point we'll be making a slight profit. Generating 4 bitcoins will take 4 bitcoins * 20 hours per bitcoin = 80 hours or a little more than 3 days.
Case 2:
Adding a second graphics card to our bitcoin farm.
Now, as discussed above I'm not worried about non-FIR graphics cards that you hatchet ran to find. If you have an FIR graphics card then you can sell it on the flea market for the 250k price that I'm using as an assumption above.
This concept is called opportunity cost and if you don't understand it I will troll you in the comments: Putting an FIR graphics card into your bitcoin farm is the same as purchasing one off of the flea market and putting it in your bitcoin farm because you had the opportunity to just sell your FIR graphics card for the same price that you can buy it.
With that out of the way, let's do some math on our 2 graphics card bitcoin farm:
BTC Generated per Hour = 0.05 + 0.003 * (Graphics Cards - 1)BTC Generated per Hour = 0.05 + 0.003 * (2 Graphics Cards - 1)BTC Generated per Hour = 0.05 + 0.003 * 1BTC Generated per Hour = 0.053
So, for the cost of 250k roubles we have increased our bitcoin per hour generation by 0.003.
The first graphics card that we added to our bitcoin farm generates us one bitcoin every 20 hours, as discussed above.
The second graphics card that we added to our bitcoin farm generates 0.003 bitcoins per hour. To calculate how many hours this takes to get 1 bitcoin we do the math of 1 / 0.003 = 333.33 hours. 333.33 hours / 24 hours per day is 13.88 or roughly 14 days.
In order to recoup our investment from the 250k roubles we used to get our second graphics card we divide 250k roubles invested by 150k roubles per bitcoin = 1.66 bitcoins. We generate one bitcoin every 14 days, so we can multiply 14 days * 1.66 bitcoins = 23 days.
This math will hold true for every additional graphics card because the function is linear.
Thus, the payback period for your 250k investment in adding a graphics card past the first one to your bitcoin farm is 23 days.
To reiterate: The FIRST graphics card you put in your bitcoin farm generates a bitcoin every 20 hours. Every additional graphics card you put in your bitcoin farm generates a bitcoin every 333.33 hours.
submitted by Death4Chairman20x70 to EscapefromTarkov [link] [comments]

[Guide] How to make money in EFT

EDIT : Thanks to everybody for pointing out the few mistakes/improvements that can be made in this new-player level guide.
For the sake of summarizing here :
- Intel documents are NOT worth 250k. I didn't check them on the flea before writing this and for some reason I always remembered them at 250k. Game is in maintenance so I can't check the real price. That being said, it's still profitable to craft USB into Intel, it's just not x2 profitable.
- Scav case : moonshine / intel docs, some people seem to say they've never been profitable. I personally *did not* measure those, I eyeballed it. I'm working on so much shit that I didn't bother. On average I think that I'm in a net positive, but it's as believable as people saying they're not : without proof we can't really say for sure. That bein said, it's certainly more profitable to run lower-tier scav runs that are *faster* when you're online, and to run a moonshine or intel when you log off. It's more efficient to get a lot of runs while you can re-start them every time.
- Crafting moonshine : It's not profitable to spam it ; I was under the assumption that the average player who will read this will usually not play for 4-5 hours straight and will end up collecting yesterday's moonshine, craft a new one, and that's it. If that's you're rythm then yes, spam it. If you intend to play more than one craft worth's of time, then you will craft moonshine faster than you can spend it, and it's not really worth to sell it on the flea except to up your market reputation for a small loss (about 10k). So in short : craft moonshine to be able to start a moonshine run for when you log off, but you don't *need* more than that.

Check this out

Here is some actual data on the lavatory !!

Hey everybody !

I know it can be a struggle to get a stable economy in this game, especially when you die a lot. Today I'm gonna try and give a few guidelines on how to make money safely, efficiently, fast, or in any other way we can think of.
If you're struggling to stay above the 15-20 million rouble treshold, this guide is definitely for you.
Very often I'll hear newer players say "Damn I can't seem to make money, I keep loosing. Every time I take gear I die instantly". There is some truth in that. Today I'll help you improve your survival rate, but most importantly I'll unbalance the other side of the equation. When you complain about losing a lot of money, I will help you spend less by a significant margin, as well as earn more. You'll also get rid of gear fera naturally.
Remember this throughout this very, very long read : It all depends on how you want to play, and how much. Some of these tips will not fit how you want to play the game, and like Nikita always says : this game is supposed to be fun before anything else.

1. Hideout

Safety Score : 100%
Reward : Moderate but very stable.
Maxing your hideout should be one of your top priorities, probably before telling your mom how much you love her every now and then. If you're not doing either of those, the big gamer in you knows what to do.
Early wipe, save your fuel for when you're online and playing. If you're playing, your generator should definitely be running and all your stations should be crafting something.
Once you have Medstation 1, Workbench 1 and Lavatory 2, you really have no reason to turn your generator off when you're playing.
Once you have the bitcoin farm, you should never turn off the generator.
Medstation :
Craft salewas and/or IFAKs permanently. They cost 8k and sell for 15k. That's a net profit of about 25k / hour for salewas, as well as never having to buy any.
Lavatory :
Always be crafting Bleach. If you have 2 empty blue fuel, use those empty cans to craft a Magazine case.
You can then keep the magazine cases until you've enough for your liking and sell those for a good profit.
The bleach you will use to buy the 6B47 helmets which are better than the SSh-68 helmets. Buying from 2x bleach barter at ragman level 1 means you get the helmet for 18k (instead of 33k on the market). This helmet has better head coverage, less slow/negative effects, less weight, has a slot for a mount, has +11 ergonomics AND is cheaper than the 22k SSh-68. That being said, it has a slight noise reduction that the Ssh does not have. If you wear headphones I'd say this is negligible but debatable. I prefer to have the extra protection and ergonomics for sure, considering it's slightly cheaper.

You can also barter for that helmet and instantly sell it back for a profit (five times) and level up ragman money requirements.
Bleach can also be traded for the Blackjack backpack at level 4, as well as the TTV rig at level 2. You should definitely do it.
Sell excess bleach on the flea market when the prices are around 10.5k or more. (around midnight Central European Time).
Workbench :
You can buy Power Cords and craft Wires forever and always make a profit. Buy in the morning and sell in the evening for better profits (CET timezone). For even more profit, you can craft gunpowders and ammo which tend to also be ridiculously pricy at night.
Buying grenades from Peacekeeper and crafting green (Eagle) gunpowder is a good way to make a lot of money and level up Peacekeeper.
Intel Center :
You main objective is to get this one to level 3 for reduced fees and better quest rewards, but also access to the bitcoin farm at level 2.
If you need FiR for quests, craft that. When you're done craft Intel Documents at all times (buy the USB), and use it for scav case or sell for a x2 profit. ( 3x40 for USB = 120, documents sell for 250)
Bitcoin Farm :
Once you have it, spend all your money on GPU until its maxxed, then level it up even more. The BTC farm is definitely worth it. At 50GPU you need to connect every 15 hours to clic. If you can't, keep it level 2 and connect every 24 hours to clic. Even at level 1 its worth. But its much, much faster at higher levels.
From 0 to 50 GPUs it takes about 30 days to pay for itself. GPUs should not be sold until you maxxed it.
Water Collector :
Must be running at all times. Buy the components if you don't have them.
Booze Generator :
Must be running at all times. Buy the components if you don't have them.
Scav Case :
Always have it running on moonshine, and use intel documents once you're done crafting one.
Nutrition Unit :
It's not really worth crafting sugar to put in the Booze gen, as the price for chocolate is pretty much = the price of sugar. So buy the sugar instead and craft something else. I tend to craft Hot Rods when the prices are good (morning) and then use them to barter 5.45 BS Ammo with Prapor or sell for a profit.

If you do all that, you should have about 150k an hour fairly easily. Don't forget to check it between every raid.

2. Traders

Safety Score : 100%
Reward : Quite good.
Once your mom has received all the love she deserves and your hideout is taken care of, you should have max traders (traders are a requirement for most of the hideout anyway).
Traders level 4 will net you much better prices on most mods and open very good barter trades.
Buy as much as you can from barter trades. You can buy almost everything from it, and it's usually at least 25% cheaper to buy the requirements and then do the barter. Ragman4 has the CPC Armored Rig which is level 5 armor, you'll get it for about 200k instead of 250k on the flea. The Slick is also much cheaper. The Blackjack backpack is literally half priced.
You can also NOT use what you barter and just sell it back to a dealer (sometimes the same from which you bartered) for a profit as well as having 2 times the loyalty money increase (from bartering then from selling).
Another good example is buying a Recbat 14k from the market, getting an ADAR for skier, selling it to Mechanic and winning 8k just like that. You can find every single barter that nets a profit yourself and just buy-resell and you'll probably make another 100k every reset, if you really are struggling and have the patience. I personally advise to just use the equipment for yourself unless you're levelling traders, but I wouldn't go as far as buying all profitable items every reset.
Every trader at every level has good barters. You can make a full decent kit at level 1 traders for about 40k roubles on barter, instead of 90 if you buy it all. (Paca for masks, helmet for bleach, ADAR for recbatt, salewa from craft, backpack, etc. all barters)

Bleach is beautiful and is coveted in the real world for its ability to cure diseases.

3. Modding

Safety Score : 100%
Reward : Very profitable.
Don't mod out of your reach. Don't mod Meta. If money is an issue for you, having +1 ergo won't change your life.
For example,
Priced at 10k roubles
Priced at 45k Roubles

See where I'm going with this?
If you have money, sure, go for the Shift. If you wanna have fun and try, sure, go for it as well. But if you're struggling, buy 4 cobras and mod 4 guns for the price of 1% recoil which will not make you a gamer god anyway.
Also, do NOT buy mods from the flea market when you see you can buy them from traders. Look at the top of the market, if the mod is greyed out, look at the price. It means you don't have access (yet). If the price is too inflated for you, find another mod. There are always other mods. You can make 2 AKMs that have a difference of 2% recoil and 4 Ergonomics and have a 150k price difference. It's up to you. When money is the issue, this was the answer.

Note : Some guns are inherently much more expensive. Guns shooting 5.56 or 5.45 tend to be more expensive than 7.62. AKMs are VERY good budget guns. They're a bit harder to handle, but you can get a fully modded AK for 150-200k, where as you will have an entry level M4 for that price. 7.62 PS ammo is also incredibly cheap while being decent. Play 7.62 if you're struggling with money. It's not meta, but it's far more than enough, trust me. You'll rarely lose fights exclusively because you had PS ammo in an AKM. Rarely.

4. Statistical loadout balance

This is fairly simple yet overlooked a LOT. To be accurate, you need data. Personally I kept it in an excel spreadsheet, if you're hardcore you should do something similar.

A somewhat relevant spreadsheet I used a wipe ago to measure some of my stats
What you need to know about yourself for this :
These will help us measure how much you fuck up or not.
Lets make it simple.
If you have a 500k loadout and you usually extract with 100k, at 10% survival rate, that means you will spend 500k x 10 = 5.000.000 roubles over 10 raids on average, die 9 times, and earn 100k once. This very obvious example shows the loss.
Basically we're gonna try and balance that equation so that you never lose money on average. You'll have ups and downs obviously, but over a week or two, it'll smooth things out for you, like math always does in a pleasant conversation with a girl.

So what can you do to improve that equation ?

4.1 Improve survival rate

Seems simple enough, DIE LESS. You do not need to be good, smart, or special to die less. If you die a lot, do something different. If you die less, try more of that. Explore statistical advantages through different gameplay.
What can you do to die less practically? Here is a list of checkboxes you can tick depending on your money, skill, mood, or any other factor like the map and sheer luck:
Do all that, it'll give you a LOT of data to actually improve by just doing something different without really being fastestronger, just smarter.
And I repeat : you can do some of it, all of it, it depends on what you like, what you're comfortable with, and the time/investment you're putting in the game. It's okay to play at your own pace.

4.2 Reduce gear cost

The second part of our "profit equation" above is how much gear you take with you. Using previous tips, reduce that cost. Barters, cheaper mods, etc.

4.3 Increase extracted value

This one is not as tricky as it sounds. Basically there are two ways to extract with more money in the backpack :
The goal is to pay for the gear you will loose when you die while making a profit on top. That one time you extract if you have a MBSS backpack, you'll need items worth like 50k per slot to break even. If you take a tri-zip, suddenly it's only 30k per slot. If you take a blackjack and blackrock from good old ragman, suddenly it's 10k per slot. So you can break even by looting crickents and DVD players almost.
See where I'm going ? Always take a tri-zip or bigger unless you're doing something special. That way you can afford to loot shitty areas, take less risk, and survive more while having a little less value.
We'll cover that in a minute, but there are ways to loot high value items, moderate value and low value. Those have also different risk/reward.

All of those are also map specific. In woods I'll often go with a 6B3TM armored rig for 40k, no helmet, 20k headphones and a sniper rifle. Rest is pouched so does not count. That's less than 100k investment. All players tend to have low value gear so I never extract with a lot either so it balances out. But on Woods, my survival rate is 20% instead of my overall 40%. So I know it's not a map I can reliably make money on, because I measured that accurately over time. This example is very common and should make sense to you.
Same goes for interchange where I have more about 50% survival but will tend to go in with 600k worth of gear, but will also often extract with over 500k quite regularly. Different ratios, different values, different purposes.
You can measure your own data if you're willing to do so, or you can eyeball it. Eyeballing it is much faster but very inaccurate because you will tend to include emotions in the mix when you die. You'll remember losses ~2x more than your wins (that's somewhat scientifically proven), and if you're eyeballing your loadout you might think you have 600k but really you might have only 450k. I would advise to go hardcore and measure it all for price, initial loadout, losses and earnings, for each map.

5. Money runs

Now money runs are vast and numerous. All include different levels of risk and reward. It's up to you once again to find what you're willing to do for the time it takes, the fun it will give you and how much it will actually help you. You can always try them all for ~50 raids the sake of trying something different and see how your data is impacted. it doesn't have to be 50 in a row if you don't want to. As long as you keep track of it it can be over a whole wipe. You'd have your data ready for the next wipe :) Faster is better though.

5.1 Hatchling runs

Safety Score : 100%
Reward : Very Variable. Mentally exhausting.
Those are incredibly money efficient. You're investing a gear of 0 value, so whatever you extract with is 100% win, so you cannot possibly lose money that way. Is it fun? Is it rewarding? I don't care, to each is own. Statistcally speaking, hatchling runs are an efficient way to make money.
They do however require a little bit of knowledge, but not skill. You'll be much more efficient at doing these kind of runs if you know where to go, what to look for, and how to get there depending on your spawn. That being said, such knoweldge is easily found ; it's nothing complex, it just takes time to learn. Once again, depends on how much you're willing to invest (if not roubles, time).

5.2 Scav runs

Safety Score : 100%
Reward : Low-ish
Scav runs are also incredibly efficient for the same reason as hatchlings. Except those have a cooldown. Statisticall speaking I have noticed you should always run your scavs as fast as possible on the map where you extract both the fastest and most frequently.
The explanation is simple, lets make it simpler :
The scav is a button that makes you earn free money. When you press it the button becomes unpressable for some time, when you release the button you earn money (sometimes).
That means you want to release the button as often as possible. And for that, you need to release it as fast as possible. It's that simple. So make scavs incredibly fast. I'm talking "Run through" fast.
Unless you're looking for FiR items or doing something specific like annoying a streamer, you should literally run straight to the extract every single time, and loot what you have that doesn't make you go out of your way too much. Usually I suggest factory, go in, kill a random scav, loot it, get out.
Two weapons is at LEAST 50k, 100 if they have a scope. There you go. That's 100k every 20 minutes (or less with intel center). That's MUCH BETTER than going up to 150-200k but taking 30 minutes to extract, and taking more risk by spending more time in the map. Every second you're in someone can shoot. Nobody can shoot you in the hideout.
The exception to that rule is Scavs with a pilgrim which you can take on your favourite loot-run map, probably interchange or reserve. There you should just fill everything you can and extract once you're full, no matter what you have. 30 crickents and an extra gun is fine.

5.3 Stash runs

Safety Score : Very
Reward : Okay
Those are very very safe and can be done with a pistol and a backpack only. Very cheap, quite unchalleneged, for a moderate reward. Just go on a map that you like and run around and loot all stashes until you're full, then get out. You can vary the map/route depending on the traffic of players. Interchange and shoreline are good contenders for that.
It'll net you easy money. Not great money, but definitely safe.

5.4 Loot Runs

Safety Score : Moderate
Reward : Quite alright
Once you have better knowledge/skill you can start having a specific route in a specific map, depending on a specific spawn. So it'll take time to learn. Usually very similar than a hatchling run except this time you bring moderate gear and go for moderate loots. For example, instead of going for fast techlight, in-and-out interchange, you can decide "alright I'll loot 100% of Oli and the computers in the back", it'll take time, but it'll make good loot. More money than stashes, definitely will see scavs to kill, and most probably some more pvp. More risk. If you win that PvP you have even more loot as well. But overall good reward.
Loot runs need to be "scheduled" and thought of after several tries, so you know how much you can take per person depending on backpack size. For example you can't say "lets loot oli" if you have a 5-man with blackjacks, you'll all be empty. Adapt.

5.4 PvP

Safety Score : Insane
Reward : Unreliably moderate
This one is pretty obvious. Very risky, unpredictable rewards. Usually better than loot runs when you survive. I won't elaborate on this, because if you're reading this far you're probably struggling in PvP. And the rest of this guide already covers a fair bit.

6. Insurance

Safety Score : "Meh"
Reward : Very profitable.
Now this is very, very important. Always insure your gear. Always.
If you die you will get stuff back, pretty much for free. If you're really struggling people won't loot your "trash", so you WILL get it back.
If you play in a group it's very likely that people will hide your stuff too.
And most importantly : you can insurance fraud. This is the best way to balance the equation we talked about earlier. If you find a decent-ish gun, replace yours. You drop your initial investment by a significant margin, you will definitely get it back, and if you extract it's a flat profit. Weapons don't take inventory slot, so if you have two weapons that are not yours initially they will usually pay for your whole gear. I have quite often left my super-mega-modded HK just for an average M4 or other weapon that I can fight with, just so I can reduce my investment by 350k and up my reward by like 200k instantly. Replace your headphones all the time too, that's an easy -30+30k, same with helmets. even if it's a bit broken or slightly worse.
If you're struggling with money, try to leave every raid with at least 3-4 pars of your equipment that aren't yours initially.
But value the risk behind this. I won't leave my slick for a Paca at the third minute of a raid just to have that extra 28k. I won't leave my meta-modded HK for a naked mosin. But if it seems decent/doable, do it. It will pay off. Because even if you die, you still get your shit back, and gun is usually the most expensive part of the gear.

7. Final notes

It's all about balance. Find what works *for you* and try shit out. Really, try. You'll die, you'll learn, you'll adapt with data to back that up. I find it crazy that people will die and not try to learn from it. That's how you will improve as a player.
First you gotta get smarter, then you'll get better. And with time, skill, mechanics, gamesense, all that will improve on the side. Earning more will snowball in your favour. And if you know you're statistically okay, you will have a much smaller gear fear and enjoy the game more.

Sorry for the wall of text, you guys should be used to it with me by now :D I made these guides in video but not in english, so here I am typing it all for you guys.
Enjoy :)
submitted by SixOneZil to EscapefromTarkov [link] [comments]

I think I'm about done.

So, last wipe, I thoroughly enjoyed the game. I struggled until I got to about level 35ish, but eventually I got my bitcoin farm going (not full 50 GPU) and my booze generator going, and I was making some decent rubles.
I could buy decent gear, the scopes I wanted, the ammo I liked (which was rarely m995,7n37, or m61, btw). And then I could go in raid, do my quests, find items, kill players, take their stuff and leave. Or, I could die and lose all my gear, and it would sting, but not break me. But when I did raids, I almost ALWAYS stayed until <10 minutes remaining, sometimes even getting out with spare seconds left. Yes, by about level 45, I eventually started making more money than I could spend, but ONLY after 50 GPU's in the BC farm and booze generator combined.
Now this wipe, instead of enjoying the raids, I'm getting frustrated trying to find progression halting items. Then, when I do find them, I'm STRONGLY encouraged to turtle up, hide until the coast is clear behind counters or in bushes, then extract at 10:01. I'm also having to buy expensive weapons like SVD's to finish quests, which I had to do last wipe too, but my rouble flow was much much higher.
I can kill a 3 man squad, and make 200k, because their armor was zero'd out and too high cost to repair and their guns with all their fancy attachments are worth 75k. Or, I can die and lose about that much. There is no real risk/reward any more.
Then, when I'm having a particularly bad day dying, I can't even lean back on looting stuff like factory keys and fuel conditioners now, AND WHAT LITTLE BIT OF FIR I SELL HAS ATROCIOUS FEES. I sold 3 packs of bolts for 14k ea and the fee was 12k.
It's like BSG isn't even trying to micro adjust the game to dial back the ruble flow. Instead it's full on scorched earth. Only the people with the absolute best combat skills or the most time to rat around have the ability to make any decent money.
On top of that, I'm level 33 and JUST got my last FIR flash drive. I have crashed against the rocks to the tune of MILLIONS trying to get a LEDX and 3 FIR graphics cards from Interchange, thanks to RNG. I can't even start Shooter Born In Heaven, and I would be 3/4 done with it by now if I had it 10 levels ago.
I'm sure* 3/4 of the subreddit will come by to tell me to quit crying, git gud, it's hardcore, roubles are easy to make, its a BETA, etc..
Well here's my Beta feedback. The game isn't fun when I lose every ruble I scrape up trying to do quests with specific gun/armor requirements and finding FIR items in hotspots, and hiding to avoid losing those items, all while BSG -heavily- deflates the economy and punishes rule obeying players in the name of stamping out RMT.
*Left out a word.
Edit: let me just say, I don’t mean this as a personal attack towards Nikita or the other devs. It’s simply just my experience, and my thoughts. I don’t have answers on how to make the perfect balances and compromises, or fixes on RMT etc.
I just wish it had been publicized ahead of time, something like “Okay guys, next wipe we’re gonna experiment with making it real hard.”
Also I’ve gotten a lot of responses saying “you’re not supposed to run the best gear every raid.” And my reply is, my standard kit is a Vepr KM, 6B23 armor, a Ratnik helmet, and comtacs, with self made BP ammo from the hideout. I’ve just recently started adding TV10 armor rigs into the mix. I’m not a META player who has to have iglonik or M995 every raid. I’m not trying to say I want to do that either.
For one CONSTRUCTIVE bit, I feel like items should have two different FIR tags. One for flea/resell, one for quests, and the quest one staying if you died with it. That would make life better to me and to a very large population of power players.
Also, between FIR changes, reduced loot spawns, increased flea fees, reduced trader sell prices, any 1-2 of those are survivable but all of them together, with more to come I'm sure, are crushing. That's all I'm saying.
EDIT Again : I just saw what Jaegers giving for guns. THAT is nice. That makes up a little bit for the stuff like fuel conditioners.
submitted by killaho69 to EscapefromTarkov [link] [comments]

Coil Whine - Unique Situation and What I've Learned and my Desparate Need for Help.

Specs listed at the bottom before you pull your hair out and throw your chair out the window.

So for the past 2 months I have been digging all over the internet and troubleshooting this problem in every way I can conceive and I have been through quite the journey to get where I am now, only to find that I may literally be the only one suffering from my unique problem. I am going to be somewhat detailed so that anyone else suffering from this might find this post and learn something (if we find a solution).
I will try to keep it concise, but I need you all to know what I have and have not tried so that we don't waste everyone's time.
I have an audio buzz. This buzz comes primarily from analogue ins/outs on my PC's hardware. USB audio ins/outs have this as well, but not nearly as bad. I have a USB mixer that I thought was the culprit, because as I was setting up the audio system for streaming it became apparent. I initially discovered ground loops and tried to mitigate the problem by eliminating that. No dice. I systematically eliminated every single ground from the system and removed components to no avail.
It would literally be impossible for me to have a ground loop with my current setup - I really dialed that in before I moved inside the PC. Yes I have even plugged the entire system (AS A TEMPORARY - LITERALLY 30 SECOND TEST) into the outlet with no ground prong (bring on the hate) to eliminate that possibility.
The main problem that I have is due to the fact that I have to monitor "listen to this device" one input or another with the way my audio works. I need on the fly control of multiple audio streams at my mixer, so I have audio running from windows into my mixer and back out at 2 points. If I want to hear anything from one of them I MUST monitor it within windows. Monitoring the USB audio source does make things significantly more quiet than monitoring the analogue line in, so I am setup this way and things are better than they could be - but still not nearly acceptable.
Spoiler: it is due to coil whine which apparently to every single other person in the world is literally a zero issue because they can hide their PC below their desk, keep the culprit component enclosed in the case or use good headphones and not have to listen to the "hardware coil whine." Nobody hears their coil whine through their audio output. If they do - they've been searching for solutions to:
These people that are searching this DO get the help they need. They simply disable a culprit unused audio source, disable monitoring "listen to this device" on an audio source, or reduce microphone boost or lower input/output levels. Some even have success disabling or enabling drivers (but I think this is not the ACTUAL solution - I notice that when I disable, uninstall or update devices/drivers, settings roll back too and any device I was monitoring is no longer monitored (or is monitored by the wrong audio output). My theory is that drivers have nothing to do with this problem - any apparent fix or genesis of the problem due to Windows Update or Drivers are actually just settings being defaulted or change by the audio system resetting.
I have also tried USB isolation and dedicated sound cards (which just pass the problem along). The problem is exactly the same no matter what because again - this is due to coil whine and it is at the hardware level at its core.
I discovered that it was coil whine after thinking I had discovered it was not coil whine. After all - removing my GPU from the equation didn't stop the sound from persisting in my headphones and a CPU can't coil whine (I don't think)... Anyways, I happen to think I have found a workaround last night. Yeah, sure - the buzz is still there but I am pretty sure it is not coming into my stream. Wrong. I load up a game (and I have my case side panel off) and before I can get into my headphones to check if the noise is back I notice it coming from inside my PC's case.
Quick throw-on of the headphones and a quick diagnostic tells me that indeed I am hearing the same noise inside the case and through my headphones. As mentioned before - the USB monitoring has lessened the problem, but not eliminated it.
So I have a big "HELL YEAH" moment. The problem is still there - but I know it is SOMEWHERE in this chunk of hardware I am looking at in front of me, and I can assume it is either the PSU, the Motherboard or the GPU.
So I take to doing some testing. In my months of research I found that when the computer is "drawing" as in pixels are generating new information, the problem is worse. I also know that loading my CPU to 100% significantly reduces the noise it is making and again I know these things can be related to changes in voltage at the CPU/GPU.
So I get a game loaded and go to work. Unplug Display Port - nothing changes significantly, but there is a small change nonetheless. But the monitor literally isn't drawing anything. The CPU is still relaying information (mouse position, the Game, etc). So either way the GPU is still receiving information, just not passing it on to the monitor.
Pull the 8 pin off the GPU - Fan cranks to 650% and I couldn't hear anything if I tried. So no dice there but I remember trying this before and not noticing much of a change either.
So now I open performance monitor, a web page with plenty of white on it (seems to generate the most noise) and start scrolling around. I notice that I get spikes on the GPU AND THE CPU when scrolling, and the noise in the headphones and at the hardware level is consistent with the movement and the readouts in Performance Monitor.
I run Cinebench r20, the CPU shuts the F**k up for the most part, but mostly because it is a high frequency now and most of it is out of normal hearing range (I have a wider hearing range due to ear training) and can pick up the low end of it (18-19khz) and think that if only this was all I had to deal with that would be great.
However, I am still getting quick spikes (during r20 test) when I move the mouse to highlight different tables on the performance monitor - so the GPU is also in on it.
Speaking of trying to isolate hardware problems: I have tried isolating the noise in the case using a straw and a notebook to block the sound and really can't determine if it is GPU, CPU, or some component on the motherboard or all three - I know it is not coming from the PSU because that is easy enough to isolate in my case (pun not intended - but enjoyed).
However, just because the PSU does not whine doesn't mean it isn't the culprit - if it is delivering unstable power to a component then it sure could be (correct me if I am wrong).
So here I am - wondering if you all have any valuable input. Please consider that I have read (no exaggeration) 200+ unique pages on this topic (broad as it was in the beginning) and I have tried everything suggested BESIDES replacing CPU, replacing, GPU, replacing MOBO, replacing PSU.
And that is why I am here asking for your advice. I need to probably replace components and I have to start somewhere - I cannot RMA anything besides the GPU (lost all proofs of purchase - paid cash for some items at retailers and lost paperwork when moving). And MSI will not RMA motherboards for Coil Whine anyway (according to numerous posts). I am prepared to buy a new MOBO and PSU, but I wonder where you think I should start.
Nvidia is looking into RMA'ing the card for me but they're hesitant.
I just want to list some other random things I have tried with no success so that you don't waste your time having to ask.
Please let me know if you have any input or are suffering the same problem. I would really appreciate it and hopefully someone suffering a problem can find this post and learn something about their own situation from all the processing I have done.

Specs:
Thanks in advance.

Update: In case this gets read by more than 3 people. Changed MOBO and PSU (independently and together - as separate tests) and nothing has changed.
submitted by oSHTsasQuatch to techsupport [link] [comments]

The next XVG? Microcap 100x potential actually supported by fundamentals!

What’s up team? I have a hot one for you. XVG returned 12 million percent in 2017 and this one reminds me a lot of it. Here’s why:
Mimblewimble is like Blu-Ray compared to CD-ROM in terms of its ability to compress data on a blockchain. The current BTC chain is 277gb and its capacity is limited because every time you spend a coin, each node needs to validate its history back to when it was mined (this is how double spending is prevented). Mimblewimble is different - all transactions in a block are aggregated and netted out in one giant CoinJoin, and only the current spending needs to be verified. This means that dramatically more transactions can fit into a smaller space, increasing throughput and lowering fees while still retaining the full proof of work game theory of Bitcoin. These blockchains are small enough to run a full node on a cheap smartphone, which enhances the decentralization and censorship resistance of the network.
The biggest benefit, though, is that all transactions are private - the blockchain doesn’t reveal amounts or addresses except to the actual wallet owner. Unlike earlier decoy-based approaches that bloat the chain and can still be data mined (XMR), Mimblewimble leaves no trace in the blockchain, instead storing only the present state of coin ownership.
The first two Mimblewimble coins, Grin and Beam, launched to great fanfare in 2019, quickly reaching over $100m in market cap (since settled down to $22m and $26m respectively). They are good projects but grin has infinite supply and huge never-decreasing emission, and Beam is a corporate moneygrab whose founding investors are counting on you buying for their ROI.
ZEC is valued at $568m today, despite the facts that only 1% of transactions are actually shielded, it has a trusted setup, and generating a confidential transaction takes ~60 seconds on a powerful PC. XMR is a great project but it’s valued at $1.2b (so no 100x) and it uses CryptoNote, which is 2014 tech that relies on a decoy-based approach that could be vulnerable to more powerful computers in the future. Mimblewimble is just a better way to approach privacy because there is simply no data recorded in the blockchain for companies to surveil.
Privacy is not just for darknet markets, porn, money launderers and terrorists. In many countries it’s dangerous to be wealthy, and there are all kinds of problems with having your spending data be out there publicly and permanently for all to see. Namely, companies like Amazon are patenting approaches to identify people with their crypto addresses, “for law enforcement” but also so that, just like credit cards, your spending data can be used to target ads. (A) Coinbase is selling user data to the DEA, IRS, FBI, Secret Service, and who knows who else? (B) What about insurance companies raising your premiums or canceling your policy because they see you buying (legal) cannabis? If your business operates using transparent cryptocurrency, competitors can data mine your customer and supply chain data, and employees can see how much everyone else gets paid. I could go on, but the idea of “I have nothing to hide, so what do I care about privacy?” will increasingly ring hollow as people realize that this money printing will have to be paid by massive tax increases AND that those taxes will be directly debited from their “Central Bank Digital Currency” wallets.
100% privacy for all transactions also eliminates one HUGE problem that people aren’t aware of yet, but they will be: fungibility. Fungibility means that each coin is indistinguishable from any other, just like paper cash. Why is this important? Because of the ever-expanding reach of AML/KYC/KYT (Anti-Money Laundering / Know Your Customer / Know Your Transaction) as regulators cramp down on crypto and banks take over, increasingly coins become “tainted” in various ways. For example, if you withdraw coins to a mixing service like Wasabi or Samourai, you may find your account blocked. (C) The next obvious step is that if you receive coins that these chainalysis services don’t like for whatever reason, you will be completely innocent yet forced to prove that you didn’t know that the coins you bought were up to no good in a past life. 3 days ago, $100k of USDC was frozen. (D) Even smaller coins like LTC now have this problem, because “Chinese Drug Kingpins” used them. (E) I believe that censorable money that can be blocked/frozen isn’t really “your money”.
Epic Cash is a 100% volunteer community project (like XVG and XMR) that had a fair launch in September last year with no ICO and no premine. There are very few projects like this, and it’s a key ingredient in Verge’s success (still at $110m market cap today despite being down 97% since the bubble peak) and why it’s still around. It has a small but super passionate community of “Freemen” who are united by a belief in the sound money economics of Bitcoin Standard emission (21m supply limit and ever-decreasing inflation) and the importance of privacy.
I am super bullish on this coin for the following reasons:
Because it doesn’t have a huge marketing budget in a sea of VC-funded shitcoins, it is as-yet undiscovered, which is why it’s so cheap. There are only 4 Mimblewimble-based currencies on the market: MWC at $162m, BEAM at $26m, GRIN at $22m, and EPIC at $0.4m. This is not financial advice and as always, do your own research, but I’ve been buying this gem for months and will continue to.
This one ticks all the boxes for me, the only real problem is that it’s hard to buy much without causing a huge green candle. Alt season is coming, and coins like this are how your neighbor Chad got his Lambo back in 2017. For 2021, McLaren is a better choice and be sure to pay cash so that it doesn’t get repossessed like Chad!
  1. A https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/d35eax/amazon-bitcoin-patent-data-stream-identify-cryptocurrency-for-law-enforcement-government
  2. B https://decrypt.co/31461/coinbase-wants-to-identify-bitcoin-users-for-dea-irs
  3. C https://www.coindesk.com/binance-blockade-of-wasabi-wallet-could-point-to-a-crypto-crack-up
  4. D https://cointelegraph.com/news/centre-freezes-ethereum-address-holding-100k-usdc
  5. E https://www.coindesk.com/us-treasury-blacklists-bitcoin-litecoin-addresses-of-chinese-drug-kingpins
  6. F https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWkTxl5Z6DNN0ASMRxSKV5g
  7. G http://epic.tech/whitepaper
  8. H https://medium.com/epic-cash/epic-cash-on-uniswap-22447904d375
  9. I https://epic.tech/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/figure-3.1.jpg
Links:
submitted by pinchegringo to CryptoMoonShots [link] [comments]

Cryptocurrency Mining Today

Cryptocurrency Mining Today
Mining is one of the key concepts in the crypto world. Everyone who comes into contact with this sphere somehow wonders about the mining of coins. How profitable is mining in 2020, and what are the current trends?
by StealthEX
Crypto mining is a process during which a computer solves mathematical problems, resulting in the release of new blocks of information. This gives its owners a certain amount of coins, which is deposited in the total pot and registered in the public “ledger”, so-called blockchain. Machines in the network are also checking transactions with existing coins, adding this information to the blockchain as well.
As for the issue itself, the most well-known algorithm of mining is Proof-of-Work (PoW), used in the networks of Bitcoin, Litecoin, Ethereum and many others.
During the mining process, the latest transactions are verified and compiled into blocks. It is usually a series of calculations with an iteration of parameters to find a hash with the specified properties. The node which first solves this problem receives a reward. This approach was specifically designed to encourage those who provide the computing power of their mining machines to maintain the network and mine new coins.
It is usually no need for a newcomer to know and understand all the complicated details of the mining process, just how much they can earn with certain equipment and electricity costs.
Everything is designed in such a way that the complexity of calculations is steadily increasing, which then requires a constant increase in the computing power of the network. In 2009-2010, for mining bitcoin, miners only had to download and run the software on their personal computers, but very soon the network became so complicated that even with best PCs with a powerful processor, mining became unprofitable. That’s why miners started to use more effective video cards (graphics processing units or GPUs) and join them in so-called “farms”.
In most systems, the number of coins is determined in advance. Also, many networks are gradually reducing rewards for miners. Such emission restrictions were built into the algorithm to prevent inflation.
Thus, the cost of mining for smaller participants no longer pays off, which makes them turn off their hardware or switch to another coin where they can still make their profit.
In particular, on the evening of May 11, 2020, a halving took place in the bitcoin network, the reward for mining was halved, from 12.5 to 6.25 BTC. In June, the revenue of bitcoin miners decreased by 23%, to the lowest since March 2019.
However, in mid-June, the difficulty of bitcoin mining showed a record growth over the past 2.5 years. Mining the first cryptocurrency has become 15% more difficult. Although, by the beginning of July, the complexity had stabilized. The growing difficulty of mining the first cryptocurrency indicates that new miners have joined its network. Previously, some of them turned off the equipment, as it became less profitable to mine the coin due to a decrease in its cost and halving.
Now the absolute majority of new coins are generated by industrial mining. This is done by large data centers equipped with specialized computers based on the ASIC architecture. ASICs are integrated circuits that were initially optimized for a specific task, namely the mining of cryptocurrencies. They are much more productive than CPUs and video cards, and at the same time consume much less electricity. ASIC computers are the main type of equipment for the industrial production of crypto.
So now, after the halving, BTC coin mining has become even less profitable. For beginners, mining the first cryptocurrency is unlikely to be suitable. It is more often earned by large companies that have all the necessary equipment, access to cheap rental conditions, electricity and maintenance.
Hence newbies are better off starting with mining altcoins. It is even more profitable to work in a pool, that is, together with other miners. This can help to place farms in one place and negotiate a favourable price for electricity, so you can get a small but stable income dux to the total capacity of the pool.
Therefore, it has become much more difficult for regular users who have only non-specialized equipment at their disposal to generate virtual money. However, GPU developers have significantly increased the performance of their devices in recent years, so mining on a video card is still common.
Another important event that changes the situation in the mining sphere will be the hardfork of the Ethereum network with the turn to the Proof-of-Stake algorithm. For now, Ethereum is the most popular altcoin for GPU mining, but Ethereum 2.0 will not require using such powerful equipment, so then it switches to PoS, GPU owners will have to look for alternative coins to mine.
At the moment the most popular altcoins for mining on GPUs are Ethereum (ETH), Ethereum Classic (ETC), Grin (GRIN), Zcoin (XZC), Dogecoin and Ravencoin (RVN). There are actually a lot of mining programs that automatically determine which coin is more profitable to mine at the moment.
In the coming years, the market is waiting for a race of technologies. Manufacturers are investing in finding ways to increase hashing speed and reduce power consumption. Mining pools will play an increasing role. The market will also be affected by applications for mining cryptocurrencies on smartphones that require low computing power, such as Dash or Litecoin.
And remember StealthEX supports more than 250 coins and constantly updating the list, so you can easily swap your crypto haul to more popular altcoins. Our service does not require registration and allows you to remain anonymous. Why don’t you check it out? Just go to StealthEX and follow these easy steps:
✔ Choose the pair and the amount for your exchange. For example ETH to BTC.
✔ Press the “Start exchange” button.
✔ Provide the recipient address to which the coins will be transferred.
✔ Move your cryptocurrency for the exchange.
✔ Receive your coins.
Follow us on Medium, Twitter, and Reddit to get StealthEX.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us via [email protected].
The views and opinions expressed here are solely those of the author. Every investment and trading move involves risk. You should conduct your own research when making a decision.
Original article was posted on https://stealthex.io/blog/2020/07/28/mining-today/
submitted by Stealthex_io to StealthEX [link] [comments]

Playkey is looking for miners on a commercial basis

We are ready to scale up our decentralized cloud gaming platform and are inviting miners to join us on a commercial basis. Based on our estimations, owners of mining hardware will be able to make up to six times more money from renting out hardware for gaming instead of mining.
Mining crypto currency with GPU farms is no longer as profitable as it used to be. Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin and other currencies are also falling in popularity. Whattomine.com estimates that a single mining machine can generate up to $15/month, whereas with Playkey once you go through the approval process we would pay you $50/month for a similarly spec’d machine.
This will greatly benefit players, as it allows to lower the gaming latency, especially for the Eastern Russia. We plan to connect miners across Russia as well as other countries, so that players would no longer have to worry about the location of the main data centers.
In order to participate in the commercial testing miners should fill in the application at https://playkey.io/en/miners/. Afterwards, the instructions on how to join will be sent out to the email provided.
How much, when and how you will get paid for renting out your PC:
  1. During the beta stage the reward is $50 per virtual machine (for a 30 day period).
  2. We pay the reward after 30 days of your machine being connected to the service.
  3. The payout options are diverse and you can choose one according to your preferences and legal status. Here are the options:
  1. In order to receive your reward and request a payout, email us at support_[email protected] after 30 days of being connected to Playkey. Use “Payout request” as your email subject.
  2. A stand-alone PC
  3. Minimal requirements:
  1. An 8 Gb flash drive for the initial unfolding
  2. Wired 50 Mb/s or faster Internet connection
  3. HDMI dummy plug or a connected HDMI display.
This is an open beta test, so there is a chance that some unexpected situations may occur. We will work out solutions as we go. After all, we could be the very first decentralized cloud gaming platform that enables users to rent out their hardware and get paid for it. This is a challenging task as much as it is something to be proud of. Let’s figure it out together. Join us!
submitted by memprojek2e to Playkey [link] [comments]

Botnets are Ruining the Integrity of the Monero Network

Take a look at the difficulty charts and watch the botnets grow. If this network is run by bad actors and the ethical cannot compete, then I don't think Monero is decentralized anymore.
submitted by crucial-conduit to Monero [link] [comments]

Playkey is looking for miners on a commercial basis

We are ready to scale up our decentralized cloud gaming platform and are inviting miners to join us on a commercial basis. Based on our estimations, owners of mining hardware will be able to make up to six times more money from renting out hardware for gaming instead of mining.
Mining crypto currency with GPU farms is no longer as profitable as it used to be. Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin and other currencies are also falling in popularity. Whattomine.com estimates that a single mining machine can generate up to $15/month, whereas with Playkey once you go through the approval process we would pay you $50/month for a similarly spec’d machine.
This will greatly benefit players, as it allows to lower the gaming latency, especially for the Eastern Russia. We plan to connect miners across Russia as well as other countries, so that players would no longer have to worry about the location of the main data centers.
In order to participate in the commercial testing miners should fill in the application at https://playkey.io/en/miners/. Afterwards, the instructions on how to join will be sent out to the email provided.
How much, when and how you will get paid for renting out your PC:
  1. During the beta stage the reward is $50 per virtual machine (for a 30 day period).
  2. We pay the reward after 30 days of your machine being connected to the service.
  3. The payout options are diverse and you can choose one according to your preferences and legal status. Here are the options:
  1. In order to receive your reward and request a payout, email us at support_[email protected] after 30 days of being connected to Playkey. Use “Payout request” as your email subject.
What are the system requirements?
  1. A stand-alone PC
  2. Minimal requirements:
  1. An 8 Gb flash drive for the initial unfolding
  2. Wired 50 Mb/s or faster Internet connection
  3. HDMI dummy plug or a connected HDMI display.
This is an open beta test, so there is a chance that some unexpected situations may occur. We will work out solutions as we go. After all, we could be the very first decentralized cloud gaming platform that enables users to rent out their hardware and get paid for it. This is a challenging task as much as it is something to be proud of. Let’s figure it out together. Join us!
submitted by memprojek2e to Playkey [link] [comments]

Need help with crashes

Currently, I am facing a major issue. When approaching certain parts of maps (currently only occurs in labs and the hideout) my computer will almost completely crash, I can still hear basic sound loops and YouTube after it crashes but there is no video output and no input does anything apart from a hard reset.
This can easily be (personally) replicated by approaching computer screens (such as the offices area on labs) or the bitcoin farm in the hideout, where after 5 seconds - 10 minutes the crash will occur (with it happening instantly commonly. especially when attempting to ALT-TAB). Because of the crash's nature, crash logs are not generated either. This issue only happens to me in Tarkov, and only at very certain places.
My Current Computer Specs:
16gb Ram
Radeon VEGA 64
AMD 2700x CPU
Thermaltake 650W GOLD PSU
Samsung 500GB SSD (which the game is run on)

Current Solutions attempted (which all have failed):
Reinstalling the game
Updating and reinstalling video/sound drivers
Refitting GPU and RAM
Factory resetting windows
Lowering graphics settings
Limiting power usage
Changing monitors

Also Note:
I've tracked the thermals and power consumption to see if the crashes are a result of this but the crash still occurs with gpu temps below 70 degrees and power consumption below 180W.

Any help would be appreciated as this is killing me, I just wanna play without being afraid of the crash
submitted by Cattac12 to EscapefromTarkov [link] [comments]

To the people who want Secure container changes, rate my thoughts

I see a whole lot of people saying something along the lines of "Don't allow putting anything in containers in-raid" as the main argument in favor of secure container changes. For you guys specifically, what do you think of the following:
  1. No valuable loot in containers. Anything that's rare can have a flag that disallows it from secure containers, so hatchlings can't put that GPU they found inside it, but newbies can take that tushonka they found in raid and still have some progress.
  2. More sources of guaranteed income. People love saying "BUT HOW CAN I MAKE MONEY WITHOUT MY SECURE, I'M REALLY SHIT AT THIS GAME". Hey, me too! you know what would help us shit players while not affecting all the rich/skilled ones? More ways to get money through the hideout! The bitcoin farm is fantastic, it generates money for nothing so everyday you have a few hundred thousand roubles no matter how bad you are. Why not add more(and cheaper) ways to get small amounts of guaranteed income so that newbies/low skill players aren't completely shafted when they die 90% of the time?
submitted by Wild_Luxray to EscapefromTarkov [link] [comments]

Understanding Crypto Mining | And perhaps a way to mitigate its impact on the PC gaming ecosystem

EDIT: Per the moderation staff, I'm adding in to the header what I'm using to make it easier for prospective miners.
  1. Go to https://www.nicehash.com/
  2. Create a login
  3. Download their software and run it (this used to be "????")
  4. Profit
Once you reach 0.002 BTC (about 7-10 days on my GTX 1060 + i7-7700k), you can transfer your earnings to Coinbase for free, and cash out. CB does have fees for conversion to Fiat (cash) and your percentage goes down with higher amounts. So don't cash out just because you can. Cash out when you have enough to buy something.
Also a note on taxes. I'm going to keep this simple.
Hi folks. I just want to thank those of you in advance who trudge through this post. It's going to be long. I will try to have a TLDR at the end, so just scroll down for the bolded text if you want Cliff's Notes.
Disclaimer: I'm a miner, sort of. I casually mine when I sleep/work, using my existing PC. It doesn't make much. I don't buy hardware for mining. But, I still wanted to post this disclaimer in the interest of fairness.
As we all know, cryptocurrency mining has had a devastating impact on the PC gaming ecosystem. The demand for GPUs for mining has lead to scarce availability and sky high prices for relevant hardware. But even hardware that is less desirable for mining relative to their peers (GTX 1050ti, 1080) has been impacted. Why? Because when gamers can't get the 1060 or 1070 that they desire, they gravitate en masse towards something that their finances will allow them to settle for.
But for all that we know about mining, there's still a LOT of myth and misinformation out there. And I blame this on the bigger miners themselves. They have a few tactics they're using to discourage competition. Now, why would they do this? Simply put, the more coins are mined, the harder the algorithms get. That means the same hardware mines a lower rate of cryptocurrency over time. If the mining rates were to get too low before new hardware (Volta/Navi) could be released, it would cause a massive depression in the cryptocurrency market. Most hardware would become unprofitable, and used GPUs would flood the market. Miners want to retain profitability on current hardware until the next generation hardware is out.
So, what tactics are they engaging in? Silence and manipulation. On the former, the bigger miners don't usually participate and contribute to the community (there are exceptions, and they are greatly appreciated). They're sponges, taking whatever the community provides without returning much to the community. On the latter, they post here, in this very sub occasionally. And they continue to push certain types of myth/misinformation to discourage other users from mining.
And why, of all people, would you discourage gamers from mining? It's because of the competition point mentioned above. If a massive number of gamers entered the cryptocurrency mining market, it could trigger a mining apocalypse. There's an estimated 3-4 million current-gen GPUs being used in 24/7 mining operations by dedicated miners. Now, how many current-gen GPUs are used by gamers? I'd bet at least an equal amount. But what about Maxwell and Kepler? Or all those GCN-based GPUs up through Fiji? Bottom line is that when you factor in all available profitable GPUs, gamers drastically outnumber dedicated miners (yes, Kepler and GCN 1.0 are still profitable, barely). And if a large number of those users started casually mining as I am, the following would occur:
  • difficulty would increase, lower output (profitability) for everyone involved
  • Coin creation would initially accelerate, and with no massive change to the market cap, that means per-coin value drops
  • when you factor in slower coin generation for individual miners, coupled with lower coin value, you get...
  • ROI length increase on GPUs, depressing their values, which would lead to lower prices and higher availability
Oh dear, someone just spilled the beans...
So naturally, misinformation needs to be spread. If dedicated miners can keep the uninformed, well, uninformed, they're less likely to join in. And I've seen variations of the following misinformation spread. Here's the common tropes, and my rebuttal.
Mining on your GPU will cause it to die prematurely.
I really wish we had a Blackblaze-equivalent for GPUs used in data centers. NOTHING punishes a GPU like full-time use in a data center. Not mining, not gaming, and not prosumer usage. And these companies pay thousands per GPU. Clearly, they're getting solid ROI for their use.
But let's talk about mining specifically. For my GTX 1060, I limit power to 80% (96W). Fan speed is at a constant 40% (that's in the same ballpark as your blower-style GPU in desktop usage). Temperature is a constant 75°C. That's gentle. Gaming hurts it more (start/stop on the fan, varying temps, quick rise at the start and fall at the end, varying loads, etc.).
And if GPUs did prematurely die from mining? One miner insisted that I'd never see an ROI on my 1060 (which cost me $240) because it would die before I could earn that amount. Yea, GPUs routinely die before hitting their ROI. That's why miners are buying $200 GPUs today for $500, or $400 GPUs today for $900. Because they don't generate enough to cover their MSRP, let alone their current gouged prices. /s
Common sense would dictate that miners are profitable, or they wouldn't mine. Therefore, GPUs are not dying prematurely. So, don't fall for this one. And yes, I've seen those photos of the 20-card Sapphire RMA. Mining data centers have THOUSANDS of cards. Just do an image search for a GPU mining farm. This is well within typical acceptable defect rates.
Power costs are too high for mining to be profitable.
Warning! Danger Will Robinson! Math ahead!
Where I live, electricity ranges from 9.5 cents per kilowatt hour (kw/hr), to 10.1 cents per kw/hr. Let's round to 10 cents. Power measured at the wall from my surge protector, while mining, shows just under 200W. (That's includes my tower, monitor, speakers, a dedicated NAS, a router, and PSU inefficiency). That also includes mining on both CPU and GPU.
At 200W per hour, that's 5 hours to hit 1kw/hr. That's 5kw/hr per 25 hours, so let's call it 5kw/hr per day. That is $0.50 per day total from that outlet (and most of this stuff would be running anyway). That's not even "over my existing costs," that's just out the door.
Bottom line is that electricity is cheap in many areas. The USA national average is currently ~12 cents per kw/hr (RIP Hawaii, at 33 cents). For most of the developed world, power costs are not prohibitive. Don't fall for this. If unsure, check your rates on your bill, and ask someone who can do math if you can't.
Casually mining isn't profitable
There's a big difference between "profit" and "getting rich." I have no expectations of the latter happening from what I'm doing. But "profit" is very much real. It's not power costs that derail profitability. It's all of the hidden fees. Many mining programs take a cut of your output. And then a cut to transfer to a wallet. And then there's a fee to transfer to an exchange. Oh, did you want to then convert to cash? We can...for a fee!
The trick is in finding outlets that allow you to minimize fees. I give up 2% of my output, transfer to my wallet for free, can transfer to an exchange for free, and don't plan to cash out every time I meet the minimum threshold (higher fees!). I instead plan to cash out at extended set intervals to minimize those fees.
NOTE: I am deliberately not listing the provider(s) that I use, because I don't want to be accused of being associated with them and/or driving business to them. I want this post to be about the big picture. But I will answer questions in the comments, provided the moderation staff here has no objections.
Bottom line is that with a mid-range GPU like mine, and without the benefit of CPU mining (it's just not worth it without a modern Core i7, or Ryzen 5/7), my GPU alone could make me ~$60-$75/mo in profit at current rates. Think of how many months/years you go between upgrades. Now, do the math. Needless to say, I'm now regretting not going bigger up front :)
It's too complicated for a casual miner, so don't bother
The old "go big or go home" saying, and it sort of piggy backs off the last one. And there is some truth in this. If you're going to be a big-time miner, you need mining programs (often dedicated to each algorithm and/or currency), multiple wallets, access to multiple exchanges, etc. It's daunting.
But for the casual, you don't need that. There are multiple providers who offer you a one-stop-shop. I have one login right now. That login gives me my mining software, which switches between multiple algorithms/coins, gives me a wallet, and lets me transfer to an outside wallet/exchange. My second login will be the exchange (something that lets me convert my currency to local cash) when my balance justifies it. Given the recent Robin Hood announcement, I'm biding my time to see what happens. This space is getting competitive (lower fees).
Bottom line, it's easier now than it ever was before. As I told someone else, "Once I finally started, I wanted to kick my own ass for waiting so long."
New GPUs are expensive, but if you just wait, there will be a buttload of cheap, used GPUs for you!
Miners learned from the last crash. There were two types of miners in that crash: those who sold their GPUs at a loss, and those who kept mining and made out like bandits on the upswing. Turns out, cryptocurrency really does mimic the stock market (for now).
We're going to look at Bitcoin (BTC) to explain this. No, miners don't mine BTC. But, BTC is commonly what most coins are exchanged for (it makes up roughly one third of the entire cryptocurrency market). And it's the easiest currency to convert to cash. So, when BTC rises or falls in price, the rest of the market goes with it. That includes all of the coins that GPU miners are actually mining.
In January 2017, when the current mining push started, BTC was worth roughly $900 per coin. It's now worth roughly (as of this post) $12,000 per coin, down from a December high of over $20,000 per coin. So yea, the market "crashed." It's also more than 12x the value it was a year ago, when miners dove in. You think they're going to bail at 12x the value? Son, I've got news for you. This market needs to truly crash and burn for them to bail (and that's where you come in!).
So, there's not going to be a flood of used GPUs from a sudden market crash. Again, they've learned from that mistake. Used GPUs will enter the market when they are no longer profitable for mining, and not before. Dedicated miners have lots of room for expansion. When Volta comes out, they're not selling their Pascal GPUs. They're building new Volta mining rigs alongside the Pascal ones, making money off each of them.
Conclusion/TLDR:
  • Mining is subject to diminishing returns. It gets harder over time on the same hardware.
  • PC gamers joining the market en masse could trigger an apocalypse in terms of difficulty
  • Due to this, it benefits pro miners to spread misinformation to discourage gamers from entering the mining game
  • Casually mining on your existing system is safe, easy, could help you pay for your next upgrade(s), and could also hurt the mining market in general (better availability/pricing on GPUs)
  • No, there's no flood of used Pascal/Polaris/Vega GPUs around the corner, as those are HIGHLY profitable even in a depressed market
Second Conclusion - Why do I (jaykresge) personally care?
Simply put, I'm disgusted by this. I was excited about flipping a few friends from consoles to PC gaming. I'm now seeing a reverse trend. One friend is gaming on an RX 560 waiting for prices to hit sanity. He's running out of patience. Others have bailed.
I view our dormant GPUs as the best weapon against cryptocurrency mining. Destroy it from the inside. It's win-win for most of us. Either we earn enough for more upgrades, or we depress pricing. Something's got to give.
In other words, y'all f*ckers better start mining, because I want Volta to be reasonably priced when it launches so I can get an EVGA x80 Hybrid to go with a G-Sync monitor. And if this doesn't happen, I'm going to be cranky!
Seriously though, thanks for reading. Bear with me as I go over this a few more times for typing/grammar. And I look forward to your comments.
submitted by jaykresge to hardware [link] [comments]

What is mining?

Mining is the activity of maintaining a distributed platform and creating new blocks with the ability to receive rewards in the form of new units and commission fees in various cryptocurrencies.
A distributed platform is a way to solve problems at once on many devices combined in parallel. In the process of mining, a mathematical problem is solved, as a result of which you can get currency for it. In other words, PC performance converts into money, and miner pays just for electricity and the Internet.
Network support consists of confirming transactions by including them into blocks and calculating the key (hash) of such a block. The key of the block does not allow changing the information of the block in the future, which excludes the possibility of counterfeiting transactions made in the block. Finding (calculating) a key with the given parameters does not occur instantly — it is necessary to generate many keys in order to get the given one. But this is not all — after generating the key, you need to receive confirmation of the fidelity of such a block from other network participants. Confirmation consists of checking the block key. In the Bitcoin network, at least 120 confirmations must be received. Such confirmation is another degree of protection against distortion and additional verification of data on the network.
The essence of mining is the creation of a whole network of decentralized computers and the necessary equipment that solves all the necessary conceived using their technical capabilities. All these connections are called nodes in mining. And, the more of them are in the blockchain system, the more decentralized the network is, and all work happens much faster.
Types of mining From the technical side, mining can be divided into 3 types, depending on the equipment:
Depending on the method, mining is divided into 3 types:
Interesting facts The terms of Bitcoins emission gave more advantages to those who took up mining with a small aggregate network capacity. So, the amount of work needed to generate the unit, in 2013 amounted to almost half a million times more than after releasing the network. With an increase in the total processing power of miners, generation becomes more energy- and hardware-intensive. This is accompanied by a planned reduction in the size of the mining reward. This way halving came in sight.
In the 2000s, fewer people knew about mining than now. Thas why, the benefit of mining was much more. But anyway there were some risks. F.e. on Reddit now you can find a lot of stories where miners got lost their keys and all the capital as well. But if there are all right with keys, the miner from 2010 has huge funds now.
Mining today Nowadays, it is quite difficult to start solo mining, because of the high competition of mining farms, pools and other entities. In addition, the start is expensive. In order to earn, you should initially invest quite a huge amount of money on expensive equipment and electricity. So you need to weigh the pros and cons before purchasing assets.
SwapSpace team is always ready for discussion. You can drop an email about your suggestions and questions to [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) Join our social networks: Twitter, Medium, Facebook The best rates on https://swapspace.co/ Why is SwapSpace https://blog.swapspace.co/2019/09/17/why-is-swapspace/
submitted by SwapSpace_co to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

What is mining?

Mining is the activity of maintaining a distributed platform and creating new blocks with the ability to receive rewards in the form of new units and commission fees in various cryptocurrencies.
A distributed platform is a way to solve problems at once on many devices combined in parallel. In the process of mining, a mathematical problem is solved, as a result of which you can get currency for it. In other words, PC performance converts into money, and miner pays just for electricity and the Internet.
Network support consists of confirming transactions by including them into blocks and calculating the key (hash) of such a block. The key of the block does not allow changing the information of the block in the future, which excludes the possibility of counterfeiting transactions made in the block. Finding (calculating) a key with the given parameters does not occur instantly — it is necessary to generate many keys in order to get the given one. But this is not all — after generating the key, you need to receive confirmation of the fidelity of such a block from other network participants. Confirmation consists of checking the block key. In the Bitcoin network, at least 120 confirmations must be received. Such confirmation is another degree of protection against distortion and additional verification of data on the network.
The essence of mining is the creation of a whole network of decentralized computers and the necessary equipment that solves all the necessary conceived using their technical capabilities. All these connections are called nodes in mining. And, the more of them are in the blockchain system, the more decentralized the network is, and all work happens much faster.
Types of mining From the technical side, mining can be divided into 3 types, depending on the equipment:
Depending on the method, mining is divided into 3 types:
Interesting facts The terms of Bitcoins emission gave more advantages to those who took up mining with a small aggregate network capacity. So, the amount of work needed to generate the unit, in 2013 amounted to almost half a million times more than after releasing the network. With an increase in the total processing power of miners, generation becomes more energy- and hardware-intensive. This is accompanied by a planned reduction in the size of the mining reward. This way halving came in sight.
In the 2000s, fewer people knew about mining than now. Thas why, the benefit of mining was much more. But anyway there were some risks. F.e. on Reddit now you can find a lot of stories where miners got lost their keys and all the capital as well. But if there are all right with keys, the miner from 2010 has huge funds now.
Mining today Nowadays, it is quite difficult to start solo mining, because of the high competition of mining farms, pools and other entities. In addition, the start is expensive. In order to earn, you should initially invest quite a huge amount of money on expensive equipment and electricity. So you need to weigh the pros and cons before purchasing assets.
SwapSpace team is always ready for discussion. You can drop an email about your suggestions and questions to [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) Join our social networks: Twitter, Medium, Facebook The best rates on https://swapspace.co/ Why is SwapSpace https://blog.swapspace.co/2019/09/17/why-is-swapspace/
submitted by SwapSpace_co to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

The thirdening and the difficulty bomb: how the Constantinople fork affected small Ethereum miners

The thirdening and the difficulty bomb: how the Constantinople fork affected small Ethereum miners
Last time, we discussed how Ethereum block rewards decreased with time – from 5 ETH to 2 ETH during the latest Constantinople fork. This so-called “thirdening” was the most contentious and potentially damaging of all award reductions. This time, we'll see why.
As you know, Ethereum is supposed to transfer from Proof-of-Work mining to Proof-of-Stake. PoW is extremely wasteful and slow, and a PoW-based coin cannot scale efficiently, because all miners have to work on the same puzzle simultaneously. Proof-of-Stake is easier, more environmentally friendly and cost-efficient. It's probably the way of the future – but for miners, it's not great. With PoS, they will only earn the transaction fees – and no block rewards at all. If Ethereum suddenly rolls out a critical update that includes PoS, chances are that most miners won't accept it.
So how do you make miners switch to PoS? That's right, by making the old PoW way unprofitable. To achieve this, Ethereum has embedded in its code a nifty and dangerous device – the so-called difficulty bomb. Difficulty means how hard it is to find the solution to each block's puzzle. The more difficult the puzzles are, the more time it takes to produce each new block – and the more energy a miner needs to expend. At first, difficulty increases just a little bit every once in a while. But then, it starts to speeds up. New blocks take more and more times to discover. Transactions take longer to confirm. And as miners find fewer new blocks, they get less rewards. Sooner or later, the network grinds to a halt. This is called the difficulty bomb, and it's the main incentive for miners to agree to Proof-of-Stake.
But as Vitalik Buterin and the others realized that it will take much more time to switch to PoS then they had thought, they had to postpone it for a year and a half. At the same time, the block was cut by a third. The founders thought that the price of ETH would grow enough to compensate for the losses. And it sort of did, but just about. Now the exchange rate of ETH to USD is around one third higher than it was at the moment of the thirdening. But miners expected it to rise more.
Another issue is the increasing competition with mining farms. Ethereum used to be the best coin for small, independent GPU miners to mine. The ETH mining algorithm – Ethash – is very different from the one used by Bitcoin. It makes it more difficult to produce ASIC hardware for mining Ethereum. As you know, ASICs dominate over BTC mining, and it's impossible for an independent miner to be profitable in the Bitcoin business.
Ethereum was even considered ASIC-proof for a while, because its algorithm regularly changed. An ASIC is programmed to do just one task, so if you modify the algorithm, all current ASICs will have to be scrapped and replaced by a new model. For a long time, ASICs for Ethereum weren't much more efficient than GPUs, so small miners could prosper.
But those good times are gone. The new generation of ASICs is twice as efficient as GPUs, leaving small miners almost no chance. Their rewards are cut to 2 ETH, the price remains low, mining farms using ASICs are starting to dominate, electricity costs are growing… It seems like all is doom and gloom for GPU miners.
Here's where 2Ether comes onto the stage. With our dynamic block rewards, small miners will finally have a level playing field with mining farms. In our next post, we'll begin to explain how it works!

https://2ether.com/
Web site — https://2ether.com/ Twitter — https://twitter.com/2Ether_ Discord — https://discord.gg/TuqG4py Facebook — https://www.facebook.com/2Ethe Reddit — https://www.reddit.com/use2Ether Medium — https://medium.com/@2ether Teletype — https://teletype.in/@2ether Telegram — https://t.me/ether2support Telegram chat — https://t.me/blockchain_2ether
submitted by 2Ether to u/2Ether [link] [comments]

Understanding Crypto Mining | And perhaps a way to mitigate its impact on the PC gaming ecosystem

This is a crosspost from /hardware, but I will be editing this independently based on community feedback and guidelines. Prior to posting here, I reached out to your local mod staff to ensure that I wasn't stepping on any toes, given the nature of its content. I hope you find this useful.
Hi folks. I just want to thank those of you in advance who trudge through this post. It's going to be long. I will try to have a TLDR at the end, so just scroll down for the bolded text if you want Cliff's Notes.
Disclaimer: I'm a miner, sort of. I casually mine when I sleep/work, using my existing PC. It doesn't make much. I don't buy hardware for mining. But, I still wanted to post this disclaimer in the interest of fairness.
As we all know, cryptocurrency mining has had a devastating impact on the PC gaming ecosystem. The demand for GPUs for mining has lead to scarce availability and sky high prices for relevant hardware. But even hardware that is less desirable for mining relative to their peers (GTX 1050ti, 1080) has been impacted. Why? Because when gamers can't get the 1060 or 1070 that they desire, they gravitate en masse towards something that their finances will allow them to settle for.
But for all that we know about mining, there's still a LOT of myth and misinformation out there. And I blame this on the bigger miners themselves. They have a few tactics they're using to discourage competition. Now, why would they do this? Simply put, the more coins are mined, the harder the algorithms get. That means the same hardware mines a lower rate of cryptocurrency over time. If the mining rates were to get too low before new hardware (Volta/Navi) could be released, it would cause a massive depression in the cryptocurrency market. Most hardware would become unprofitable, and used GPUs would flood the market. Miners want to retain profitability on current hardware until the next generation hardware is out.
So, what tactics are they engaging in? Silence and manipulation. On the former, the bigger miners don't usually participate and contribute to the community (there are exceptions, and they are greatly appreciated). They're sponges, taking whatever the community provides without returning much to the community. On the latter, they post here, in this very sub occasionally. And they continue to push certain types of myth/misinformation to discourage other users from mining.
And why, of all people, would you discourage gamers from mining? It's because of the competition point mentioned above. If a massive number of gamers entered the cryptocurrency mining market, it could trigger a mining apocalypse. There's an estimated 3-4 million current-gen GPUs being used in 24/7 mining operations by dedicated miners. Now, how many current-gen GPUs are used by gamers? I'd bet at least an equal amount. But what about Maxwell and Kepler? Or all those GCN-based GPUs up through Fiji? Bottom line is that when you factor in all available profitable GPUs, gamers drastically outnumber dedicated miners (yes, Kepler and GCN 1.0 are still profitable, barely). And if a large number of those users started casually mining as I am, the following would occur:
  • difficulty would increase, lower output (profitability) for everyone involved
  • Coin creation would initially accelerate, and with no massive change to the market cap, that means per-coin value drops
  • when you factor in slower coin generation for individual miners, coupled with lower coin value, you get...
  • ROI length increase on GPUs, depressing their values, which would lead to lower prices and higher availability
Oh dear, someone just spilled the beans...
So naturally, misinformation needs to be spread. If dedicated miners can keep the uninformed, well, uninformed, they're less likely to join in. And I've seen variations of the following misinformation spread. Here's the common tropes, and my rebuttal.
Mining on your GPU will cause it to die prematurely.
I really wish we had a Blackblaze-equivalent for GPUs used in data centers. NOTHING punishes a GPU like full-time use in a data center. Not mining, not gaming, and not prosumer usage. And these companies pay thousands per GPU. Clearly, they're getting solid ROI for their use.
But let's talk about mining specifically. For my GTX 1060, I limit power to 80% (96W). Fan speed is at a constant 40% (that's in the same ballpark as your blower-style GPU in desktop usage). Temperature is a constant 75°C. That's gentle. Gaming hurts it more (start/stop on the fan, varying temps, quick rise at the start and fall at the end, varying loads, etc.).
And if GPUs did prematurely die from mining? One miner insisted that I'd never see an ROI on my 1060 (which cost me $240) because it would die before I could earn that amount. Yea, GPUs routinely die before hitting their ROI. That's why miners are buying $200 GPUs today for $500, or $400 GPUs today for $900. Because they don't generate enough to cover their MSRP, let alone their current gouged prices. /s
Common sense would dictate that miners are profitable, or they wouldn't mine. Therefore, GPUs are not dying prematurely. So, don't fall for this one. And yes, I've seen those photos of the 20-card Sapphire RMA. Mining data centers have THOUSANDS of cards. Just do an image search for a GPU mining farm. This is well within typical acceptable defect rates.
Power costs are too high for mining to be profitable.
Warning! Danger Will Robinson! Math ahead!
Where I live, electricity ranges from 9.5 cents per kilowatt hour (kw/hr), to 10.1 cents per kw/hr. Let's round to 10 cents. Power measured at the wall from my surge protector, while mining, shows just under 200W. (That's includes my tower, monitor, speakers, a dedicated NAS, a router, and PSU inefficiency). That also includes mining on both CPU and GPU.
At 200W per hour, that's 5 hours to hit 1kw/hr. That's 5kw/hr per 25 hours, so let's call it 5kw/hr per day. That is $0.50 per day total from that outlet (and most of this stuff would be running anyway). That's not even "over my existing costs," that's just out the door.
Bottom line is that electricity is cheap in many areas. The USA national average is currently ~12 cents per kw/hr (RIP Hawaii, at 33 cents). For most of the developed world, power costs are not prohibitive. Don't fall for this. If unsure, check your rates on your bill, and ask someone who can do math if you can't.
Casually mining isn't profitable
There's a big difference between "profit" and "getting rich." I have no expectations of the latter happening from what I'm doing. But "profit" is very much real. It's not power costs that derail profitability. It's all of the hidden fees. Many mining programs take a cut of your output. And then a cut to transfer to a wallet. And then there's a fee to transfer to an exchange. Oh, did you want to then convert to cash? We can...for a fee!
The trick is in finding outlets that allow you to minimize fees. I give up 2% of my output, transfer to my wallet for free, can transfer to an exchange for free, and don't plan to cash out every time I meet the minimum threshold (higher fees!). I instead plan to cash out at extended set intervals to minimize those fees.
NOTE: I am deliberately not listing the provider(s) that I use, because I don't want to be accused of being associated with them and/or driving business to them. I want this post to be about the big picture. But I will answer questions in the comments, provided the moderation staff here has no objections.
Bottom line is that with a mid-range GPU like mine, and without the benefit of CPU mining (it's just not worth it without a modern Core i7, or Ryzen 5/7), my GPU alone could make me ~$60-$75/mo in profit at current rates. Think of how many months/years you go between upgrades. Now, do the math. Needless to say, I'm now regretting not going bigger up front :)
It's too complicated for a casual miner, so don't bother
The old "go big or go home" saying, and it sort of piggy backs off the last one. And there is some truth in this. If you're going to be a big-time miner, you need mining programs (often dedicated to each algorithm and/or currency), multiple wallets, access to multiple exchanges, etc. It's daunting.
But for the casual, you don't need that. There are multiple providers who offer you a one-stop-shop. I have one login right now. That login gives me my mining software, which switches between multiple algorithms/coins, gives me a wallet, and lets me transfer to an outside wallet/exchange. My second login will be the exchange (something that lets me convert my currency to local cash) when my balance justifies it. Given the recent Robin Hood announcement, I'm biding my time to see what happens. This space is getting competitive (lower fees).
Bottom line, it's easier now than it ever was before. As I told someone else, "Once I finally started, I wanted to kick my own ass for waiting so long."
New GPUs are expensive, but if you just wait, there will be a buttload of cheap, used GPUs for you!
Miners learned from the last crash. There were two types of miners in that crash: those who sold their GPUs at a loss, and those who kept mining and made out like bandits on the upswing. Turns out, cryptocurrency really does mimic the stock market (for now).
We're going to look at Bitcoin (BTC) to explain this. No, miners don't mine BTC. But, BTC is commonly what most coins are exchanged for (it makes up roughly one third of the entire cryptocurrency market). And it's the easiest currency to convert to cash. So, when BTC rises or falls in price, the rest of the market goes with it. That includes all of the coins that GPU miners are actually mining.
In January 2017, when the current mining push started, BTC was worth roughly $900 per coin. It's now worth roughly (as of this post) $12,000 per coin, down from a December high of over $20,000 per coin. So yea, the market "crashed." It's also more than 12x the value it was a year ago, when miners dove in. You think they're going to bail at 12x the value? Son, I've got news for you. This market needs to truly crash and burn for them to bail (and that's where you come in!).
So, there's not going to be a flood of used GPUs from a sudden market crash. Again, they've learned from that mistake. Used GPUs will enter the market when they are no longer profitable for mining, and not before. Dedicated miners have lots of room for expansion. When Volta comes out, they're not selling their Pascal GPUs. They're building new Volta mining rigs alongside the Pascal ones, making money off each of them.
Conclusion/TLDR:
  • Mining is subject to diminishing returns. It gets harder over time on the same hardware.
  • PC gamers joining the market en masse could trigger an apocalypse in terms of difficulty
  • Due to this, it benefits pro miners to spread misinformation to discourage gamers from entering the mining game
  • Casually mining on your existing system is safe, easy, could help you pay for your next upgrade(s), and could also hurt the mining market in general (better availability/pricing on GPUs)
  • No, there's no flood of used Pascal/Polaris/Vega GPUs around the corner, as those are HIGHLY profitable even in a depressed market
Second Conclusion - Why do I (jaykresge) personally care?
Simply put, I'm disgusted by this. I was excited about flipping a few friends from consoles to PC gaming. I'm now seeing a reverse trend. One friend is gaming on an RX 560 waiting for prices to hit sanity. He's running out of patience. Others have bailed.
I view our dormant GPUs as the best weapon against cryptocurrency mining. Destroy it from the inside. It's win-win for most of us. Either we earn enough for more upgrades, or we depress pricing. Something's got to give.
In other words, y'all f*ckers better start mining, because I want Volta to be reasonably priced when it launches so I can get an EVGA x80 Hybrid to go with a G-Sync monitor. And if this doesn't happen, I'm going to be cranky!
Seriously though, thanks for reading.
submitted by jaykresge to pcgaming [link] [comments]

What is mining?

Mining is the activity of maintaining a distributed platform and creating new blocks with the ability to receive rewards in the form of new units and commission fees in various cryptocurrencies.
A distributed platform is a way to solve problems at once on many devices combined in parallel. In the process of mining, a mathematical problem is solved, as a result of which you can get currency for it. In other words, PC performance converts into money, and miner pays just for electricity and the Internet.
Network support consists of confirming transactions by including them into blocks and calculating the key (hash) of such a block. The key of the block does not allow changing the information of the block in the future, which excludes the possibility of counterfeiting transactions made in the block. Finding (calculating) a key with the given parameters does not occur instantly — it is necessary to generate many keys in order to get the given one. But this is not all — after generating the key, you need to receive confirmation of the fidelity of such a block from other network participants. Confirmation consists of checking the block key. In the Bitcoin network, at least 120 confirmations must be received. Such confirmation is another degree of protection against distortion and additional verification of data on the network.
The essence of mining is the creation of a whole network of decentralized computers and the necessary equipment that solves all the necessary conceived using their technical capabilities. All these connections are called nodes in mining. And, the more of them are in the blockchain system, the more decentralized the network is, and all work happens much faster.
Types of mining From the technical side, mining can be divided into 3 types, depending on the equipment:
Depending on the method, mining is divided into 3 types:
Interesting facts The terms of Bitcoins emission gave more advantages to those who took up mining with a small aggregate network capacity. So, the amount of work needed to generate the unit, in 2013 amounted to almost half a million times more than after releasing the network. With an increase in the total processing power of miners, generation becomes more energy- and hardware-intensive. This is accompanied by a planned reduction in the size of the mining reward. This way halving came in sight.
In the 2000s, fewer people knew about mining than now. Thas why, the benefit of mining was much more. But anyway there were some risks. F.e. on Reddit now you can find a lot of stories where miners got lost their keys and all the capital as well. But if there are all right with keys, the miner from 2010 has huge funds now.
Mining today Nowadays, it is quite difficult to start solo mining, because of the high competition of mining farms, pools and other entities. In addition, the start is expensive. In order to earn, you should initially invest quite a huge amount of money on expensive equipment and electricity. So you need to weigh the pros and cons before purchasing assets.
SwapSpace team is always ready for discussion. You can drop an email about your suggestions and questions to [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) Join our social networks: Twitter, Medium, Facebook The best rates on https://swapspace.co/ Why is SwapSpace https://blog.swapspace.co/2019/09/17/why-is-swapspace/
submitted by SwapSpace_co to dogemining [link] [comments]

What is mining?

Mining is the activity of maintaining a distributed platform and creating new blocks with the ability to receive rewards in the form of new units and commission fees in various cryptocurrencies.
A distributed platform is a way to solve problems at once on many devices combined in parallel. In the process of mining, a mathematical problem is solved, as a result of which you can get currency for it. In other words, PC performance converts into money, and miner pays just for electricity and the Internet.
Network support consists of confirming transactions by including them into blocks and calculating the key (hash) of such a block. The key of the block does not allow changing the information of the block in the future, which excludes the possibility of counterfeiting transactions made in the block. Finding (calculating) a key with the given parameters does not occur instantly — it is necessary to generate many keys in order to get the given one. But this is not all — after generating the key, you need to receive confirmation of the fidelity of such a block from other network participants. Confirmation consists of checking the block key. In the Bitcoin network, at least 120 confirmations must be received. Such confirmation is another degree of protection against distortion and additional verification of data on the network.
The essence of mining is the creation of a whole network of decentralized computers and the necessary equipment that solves all the necessary conceived using their technical capabilities. All these connections are called nodes in mining. And, the more of them are in the blockchain system, the more decentralized the network is, and all work happens much faster.
Types of mining From the technical side, mining can be divided into 3 types, depending on the equipment:
Depending on the method, mining is divided into 3 types:
Interesting facts The terms of Bitcoins emission gave more advantages to those who took up mining with a small aggregate network capacity. So, the amount of work needed to generate the unit, in 2013 amounted to almost half a million times more than after releasing the network. With an increase in the total processing power of miners, generation becomes more energy- and hardware-intensive. This is accompanied by a planned reduction in the size of the mining reward. This way halving came in sight.
In the 2000s, fewer people knew about mining than now. Thas why, the benefit of mining was much more. But anyway there were some risks. F.e. on Reddit now you can find a lot of stories where miners got lost their keys and all the capital as well. But if there are all right with keys, the miner from 2010 has huge funds now.
Mining today Nowadays, it is quite difficult to start solo mining, because of the high competition of mining farms, pools and other entities. In addition, the start is expensive. In order to earn, you should initially invest quite a huge amount of money on expensive equipment and electricity. So you need to weigh the pros and cons before purchasing assets.
SwapSpace team is always ready for discussion. You can drop an email about your suggestions and questions to [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) Join our social networks: Twitter, Medium, Facebook The best rates on https://swapspace.co/ Why is SwapSpace https://blog.swapspace.co/2019/09/17/why-is-swapspace/
submitted by SwapSpace_co to CoinBase [link] [comments]

What is mining?

Mining is the activity of maintaining a distributed platform and creating new blocks with the ability to receive rewards in the form of new units and commission fees in various cryptocurrencies.
A distributed platform is a way to solve problems at once on many devices combined in parallel. In the process of mining, a mathematical problem is solved, as a result of which you can get currency for it. In other words, PC performance converts into money, and miner pays just for electricity and the Internet.
Network support consists of confirming transactions by including them into blocks and calculating the key (hash) of such a block. The key of the block does not allow changing the information of the block in the future, which excludes the possibility of counterfeiting transactions made in the block. Finding (calculating) a key with the given parameters does not occur instantly — it is necessary to generate many keys in order to get the given one. But this is not all — after generating the key, you need to receive confirmation of the fidelity of such a block from other network participants. Confirmation consists of checking the block key. In the Bitcoin network, at least 120 confirmations must be received. Such confirmation is another degree of protection against distortion and additional verification of data on the network.
The essence of mining is the creation of a whole network of decentralized computers and the necessary equipment that solves all the necessary conceived using their technical capabilities. All these connections are called nodes in mining. And, the more of them are in the blockchain system, the more decentralized the network is, and all work happens much faster.
Types of mining From the technical side, mining can be divided into 3 types, depending on the equipment:
Depending on the method, mining is divided into 3 types:
Interesting facts The terms of Bitcoins emission gave more advantages to those who took up mining with a small aggregate network capacity. So, the amount of work needed to generate the unit, in 2013 amounted to almost half a million times more than after releasing the network. With an increase in the total processing power of miners, generation becomes more energy- and hardware-intensive. This is accompanied by a planned reduction in the size of the mining reward. This way halving came in sight.
In the 2000s, fewer people knew about mining than now. Thas why, the benefit of mining was much more. But anyway there were some risks. F.e. on Reddit now you can find a lot of stories where miners got lost their keys and all the capital as well. But if there are all right with keys, the miner from 2010 has huge funds now.
Mining today Nowadays, it is quite difficult to start solo mining, because of the high competition of mining farms, pools and other entities. In addition, the start is expensive. In order to earn, you should initially invest quite a huge amount of money on expensive equipment and electricity. So you need to weigh the pros and cons before purchasing assets.
SwapSpace team is always ready for discussion. You can drop an email about your suggestions and questions to [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) Join our social networks: Twitter, Medium, Facebook The best rates on https://swapspace.co/ Why is SwapSpace https://blog.swapspace.co/2019/09/17/why-is-swapspace/
submitted by SwapSpace_co to CoinTelegraph [link] [comments]

What is mining?

Mining is the activity of maintaining a distributed platform and creating new blocks with the ability to receive rewards in the form of new units and commission fees in various cryptocurrencies.
A distributed platform is a way to solve problems at once on many devices combined in parallel. In the process of mining, a mathematical problem is solved, as a result of which you can get currency for it. In other words, PC performance converts into money, and miner pays just for electricity and the Internet.
Network support consists of confirming transactions by including them into blocks and calculating the key (hash) of such a block. The key of the block does not allow changing the information of the block in the future, which excludes the possibility of counterfeiting transactions made in the block. Finding (calculating) a key with the given parameters does not occur instantly — it is necessary to generate many keys in order to get the given one. But this is not all — after generating the key, you need to receive confirmation of the fidelity of such a block from other network participants. Confirmation consists of checking the block key. In the Bitcoin network, at least 120 confirmations must be received. Such confirmation is another degree of protection against distortion and additional verification of data on the network.
The essence of mining is the creation of a whole network of decentralized computers and the necessary equipment that solves all the necessary conceived using their technical capabilities. All these connections are called nodes in mining. And, the more of them are in the blockchain system, the more decentralized the network is, and all work happens much faster.
Types of mining From the technical side, mining can be divided into 3 types, depending on the equipment:
Depending on the method, mining is divided into 3 types:
Interesting facts The terms of Bitcoins emission gave more advantages to those who took up mining with a small aggregate network capacity. So, the amount of work needed to generate the unit, in 2013 amounted to almost half a million times more than after releasing the network. With an increase in the total processing power of miners, generation becomes more energy- and hardware-intensive. This is accompanied by a planned reduction in the size of the mining reward. This way halving came in sight.
In the 2000s, fewer people knew about mining than now. Thas why, the benefit of mining was much more. But anyway there were some risks. F.e. on Reddit now you can find a lot of stories where miners got lost their keys and all the capital as well. But if there are all right with keys, the miner from 2010 has huge funds now.
Mining today Nowadays, it is quite difficult to start solo mining, because of the high competition of mining farms, pools and other entities. In addition, the start is expensive. In order to earn, you should initially invest quite a huge amount of money on expensive equipment and electricity. So you need to weigh the pros and cons before purchasing assets.
SwapSpace team is always ready for discussion. You can drop an email about your suggestions and questions to [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) Join our social networks: Twitter, Medium, Facebook The best rates on https://swapspace.co/ Why is SwapSpace https://blog.swapspace.co/2019/09/17/why-is-swapspace/
submitted by SwapSpace_co to ethtrader [link] [comments]

The Problem with PoW

The Problem with PoW
Miners have always had it rough..
"Frustrated Miners"

The Problem with PoW
(and what is being done to solve it)

Proof of Work (PoW) is one of the most commonly used consensus mechanisms entrusted to secure and validate many of today’s most successful cryptocurrencies, Bitcoin being one. Battle-hardened and having weathered the test of time, Bitcoin has demonstrated the undeniable strength and reliability of the PoW consensus model through sheer market saturation, and of course, its persistency.
In addition to the cost of powerful computing hardware, miners prove that they are benefiting the network by expending energy in the form of electricity, by solving and hashing away complex math problems on their computers, utilizing any suitable tools that they have at their disposal. The mathematics involved in securing proof of work revolve around unique algorithms, each with their own benefits and vulnerabilities, and can require different software/hardware to mine depending on the coin.
Because each block has a unique and entirely random hash, or “puzzle” to solve, the “work” has to be performed for each block individually and the difficulty of the problem can be increased as the speed at which blocks are solved increases.

Hashrates and Hardware Types

While proof of work is an effective means of securing a blockchain, it inherently promotes competition amongst miners seeking higher and higher hashrates due to the rewards earned by the node who wins the right to add the next block. In turn, these higher hash rates benefit the blockchain, providing better security when it’s a result of a well distributed/decentralized network of miners.
When Bitcoin first launched its genesis block, it was mined exclusively by CPUs. Over the years, various programmers and developers have devised newer, faster, and more energy efficient ways to generate higher hashrates; some by perfecting the software end of things, and others, when the incentives are great enough, create expensive specialized hardware such as ASICs (application-specific integrated circuit). With the express purpose of extracting every last bit of hashing power, efficiency being paramount, ASICs are stripped down, bare minimum, hardware representations of a specific coin’s algorithm.
This gives ASICS a massive advantage in terms of raw hashing power and also in terms of energy consumption against CPUs/GPUs, but with significant drawbacks of being very expensive to design/manufacture, translating to a high economic barrier for the casual miner. Due to the fact that they are virtual hardware representations of a single targeted algorithm, this means that if a project decides to fork and change algorithms suddenly, your powerful brand-new ASIC becomes a very expensive paperweight. The high costs in developing and manufacturing ASICs and the associated risks involved, make them unfit for mass adoption at this time.
Somewhere on the high end, in the vast hashrate expanse created between GPU and ASIC, sits the FPGA (field programmable gate array). FPGAs are basically ASICs that make some compromises with efficiency in order to have more flexibility, namely they are reprogrammable and often used in the “field” to test an algorithm before implementing it in an ASIC. As a precursor to the ASIC, FPGAs are somewhat similar to GPUs in their flexibility, but require advanced programming skills and, like ASICs, are expensive and still fairly uncommon.

2 Guys 1 ASIC

One of the issues with proof of work incentivizing the pursuit of higher hashrates is in how the network calculates block reward coinbase payouts and rewards miners based on the work that they have submitted. If a coin generated, say a block a minute, and this is a constant, then what happens if more miners jump on a network and do more work? The network cannot pay out more than 1 block reward per 1 minute, and so a difficulty mechanism is used to maintain balance. The difficulty will scale up and down in response to the overall nethash, so if many miners join the network, or extremely high hashing devices such as ASICs or FPGAs jump on, the network will respond accordingly, using the difficulty mechanism to make the problems harder, effectively giving an edge to hardware that can solve them faster, balancing the network. This not only maintains the block a minute reward but it has the added side-effect of energy requirements that scale up with network adoption.
Imagine, for example, if one miner gets on a network all alone with a CPU doing 50 MH/s and is getting all 100 coins that can possibly be paid out in a day. Then, if another miner jumps on the network with the same CPU, each miner would receive 50 coins in a day instead of 100 since they are splitting the required work evenly, despite the fact that the net electrical output has doubled along with the work. Electricity costs miner’s money and is a factor in driving up coin price along with adoption, and since more people are now mining, the coin is less centralized. Now let’s say a large corporation has found it profitable to manufacture an ASIC for this coin, knowing they will make their money back mining it or selling the units to professionals. They join the network doing 900 MH/s and will be pulling in 90 coins a day, while the two guys with their CPUs each get 5 now. Those two guys aren’t very happy, but the corporation is. Not only does this negatively affect the miners, it compromises the security of the entire network by centralizing the coin supply and hashrate, opening the doors to double spends and 51% attacks from potential malicious actors. Uncertainty of motives and questionable validity in a distributed ledger do not mix.
When technology advances in a field, it is usually applauded and welcomed with open arms, but in the world of crypto things can work quite differently. One of the glaring flaws in the current model and the advent of specialized hardware is that it’s never ending. Suppose the two men from the rather extreme example above took out a loan to get themselves that ASIC they heard about that can get them 90 coins a day? When they join the other ASIC on the network, the difficulty adjusts to keep daily payouts consistent at 100, and they will each receive only 33 coins instead of 90 since the reward is now being split three ways. Now what happens if a better ASIC is released by that corporation? Hopefully, those two guys were able to pay off their loans and sell their old ASICs before they became obsolete.
This system, as it stands now, only perpetuates a never ending hashrate arms race in which the weapons of choice are usually a combination of efficiency, economics, profitability and in some cases control.

Implications of Centralization

This brings us to another big concern with expensive specialized hardware: the risk of centralization. Because they are so expensive and inaccessible to the casual miner, ASICs and FPGAs predominantly remain limited to a select few. Centralization occurs when one small group or a single entity controls the vast majority hash power and, as a result, coin supply and is able to exert its influence to manipulate the market or in some cases, the network itself (usually the case of dishonest nodes or bad actors).
This is entirely antithetical of what cryptocurrency was born of, and since its inception many concerted efforts have been made to avoid centralization at all costs. An entity in control of a centralized coin would have the power to manipulate the price, and having a centralized hashrate would enable them to affect network usability, reliability, and even perform double spends leading to the demise of a coin, among other things.
The world of crypto is a strange new place, with rapidly growing advancements across many fields, economies, and boarders, leaving plenty of room for improvement; while it may feel like a never-ending game of catch up, there are many talented developers and programmers working around the clock to bring us all more sustainable solutions.

The Rise of FPGAs

With the recent implementation of the commonly used coding language C++, and due to their overall flexibility, FPGAs are becoming somewhat more common, especially in larger farms and in industrial setting; but they still remain primarily out of the hands of most mining enthusiasts and almost unheard of to the average hobby miner. Things appear to be changing though, one example of which I’ll discuss below, and it is thought by some, that soon we will see a day when mining with a CPU or GPU just won’t cut it any longer, and the market will be dominated by FPGAs and specialized ASICs, bringing with them efficiency gains for proof of work, while also carelessly leading us all towards the next round of spending.
A perfect real-world example of the effect specialized hardware has had on the crypto-community was recently discovered involving a fairly new project called VerusCoin and a fairly new, relatively more economically accessible FPGA. The FPGA is designed to target specific alt-coins whose algo’s do not require RAM overhead. It was discovered the company had released a new algorithm, kept secret from the public, which could effectively mine Verus at 20x the speed of GPUs, which were the next fastest hardware types mining on the Verus network.
Unfortunately this was done with a deliberately secret approach, calling the Verus algorithm “Algo1” and encouraging owners of the FPGA to never speak of the algorithm in public channels, admonishing a user when they did let the cat out of the bag. The problem with this business model is that it is parasitic in nature. In an ecosystem where advancements can benefit the entire crypto community, this sort of secret mining approach also does not support the philosophies set forth by the Bitcoin or subsequent open source and decentralization movements.
Although this was not done in the spirit of open source, it does hint to an important step in hardware innovation where we could see more efficient specialized systems within reach of the casual miner. The FPGA requires unique sets of data called a bitstream in order to be able to recognize each individual coin’s algorithm and mine them. Because it’s reprogrammable, with the support of a strong development team creating such bitstreams, the miner doesn’t end up with a brick if an algorithm changes.

All is not lost thanks to.. um.. Technology?

Shortly after discovering FPGAs on the network, the Verus developers quickly designed, tested, and implemented a new, much more complex and improved algorithm via a fork that enabled Verus to transition smoothly from VerusHash 1.0 to VerusHash 2.0 at block 310,000. Since the fork, VerusHash 2.0 has demonstrated doing exactly what it was designed for- equalizing hardware performance relative to the device being used while enabling CPUs (the most widely available “ASICs”) to mine side by side with GPUs, at a profit and it appears this will also apply to other specialized hardware. This is something no other project has been able to do until now. Rather than pursue the folly of so many other projects before it- attempting to be “ASIC proof”, Verus effectively achieved and presents to the world an entirely new model of “hardware homogeny”. As the late, great, Bruce Lee once said- “Don’t get set into one form, adapt it and build your own, and let it grow, be like water.”
In the design of VerusHash 2.0, Verus has shown it doesn’t resist progress like so many other new algorithms try to do, it embraces change and adapts to it in the way that water becomes whatever vessel it inhabits. This new approach- an industry first- could very well become an industry standard and in doing so, would usher in a new age for proof of work based coins. VerusHash 2.0 has the potential to correct the single largest design flaw in the proof of work consensus mechanism- the ever expanding monetary and energy requirements that have plagued PoW based projects since the inception of the consensus mechanism. Verus also solves another major issue of coin and net hash centralization by enabling legitimate CPU mining, offering greater coin and hashrate distribution.
Digging a bit deeper it turns out the Verus development team are no rookies. The lead developer Michael F Toutonghi has spent decades in the field programming and is a former Vice President and Technical Fellow at Microsoft, recognized founder and architect of Microsoft's .Net platform, ex-Technical Fellow of Microsoft's advertising platform, ex-CTO, Parallels Corporation, and an experienced distributed computing and machine learning architect. The project he helped create employs and makes use of a diverse myriad of technologies and security features to form one of the most advanced and secure cryptocurrency to date. A brief description of what makes VerusCoin special quoted from a community member-
"Verus has a unique and new consensus algorithm called Proof of Power which is a 50% PoW/50% PoS algorithm that solves theoretical weaknesses in other PoS systems (Nothing at Stake problem for example) and is provably immune to 51% hash attacks. With this, Verus uses the new hash algorithm, VerusHash 2.0. VerusHash 2.0 is designed to better equalize mining across all hardware platforms, while favoring the latest CPUs over older types, which is also one defense against the centralizing potential of botnets. Unlike past efforts to equalize hardware hash-rates across different hardware types, VerusHash 2.0 explicitly enables CPUs to gain even more power relative to GPUs and FPGAs, enabling the most decentralizing hardware, CPUs (due to their virtually complete market penetration), to stay relevant as miners for the indefinite future. As for anonymity, Verus is not a "forced private", allowing for both transparent and shielded (private) transactions...and private messages as well"

If other projects can learn from this and adopt a similar approach or continue to innovate with new ideas, it could mean an end to all the doom and gloom predictions that CPU and GPU mining are dead, offering a much needed reprieve and an alternative to miners who have been faced with the difficult decision of either pulling the plug and shutting down shop or breaking down their rigs to sell off parts and buy new, more expensive hardware…and in so doing present an overall unprecedented level of decentralization not yet seen in cryptocurrency.
Technological advancements led us to the world of secure digital currencies and the progress being made with hardware efficiencies is indisputably beneficial to us all. ASICs and FPGAs aren’t inherently bad, and there are ways in which they could be made more affordable and available for mass distribution. More than anything, it is important that we work together as communities to find solutions that can benefit us all for the long term.

In an ever changing world where it may be easy to lose sight of the real accomplishments that brought us to this point one thing is certain, cryptocurrency is here to stay and the projects that are doing something to solve the current problems in the proof of work consensus mechanism will be the ones that lead us toward our collective vision of a better world- not just for the world of crypto but for each and every one of us.
submitted by Godballz to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Bitmine.farm. (SCAM) 2500 GPUs Cryptocurrency Mining Farm - Welcome to the BBT Farm! How Mining Bitcoin Works? Get Passive Income in Bitcoin Mining Daily 2020 Free Bitcoin Generator  Bitcoin mining farm  Get 0.01 TH/s Bitcoin Generator 2020 Legit And Payment Proof

Generate Bitcoin Amount: BTC. Important: Please reload the page if you are experiencing problems with amount selection. Choosing a larger amount of Bitcoin then the recommended daily amount might result in a failure in the connection! Info: This tool is currently ONLINE and working in its best. It is available for free Bitcoin generation. We reserve the right to stop the tool at any time ... For an updated guide about Bitcoin mining read this post. If you’ve heard about Bitcoin you probably also heard about Bitcoin mining. Bitcoin mining is the process of turning computing power into actual Bitcoins. It allows you to generate Bitcoins without the need to actually buy them. Now a lot of people say that mining can’t be done on a home computer and that you need very expensive ... Free Bitcoin Mining is a smart blockchain based Free Mining Pool for free cloud mining. We established in 2017. And we provides FGPA Mining, GPU mining & CPU mining possibility on the web. Hashing Power of active computer on the internet start processing the hashes and start mining free bitcoin without any investments on complex mining hardware. We took 6 months to set up our latest and high-speed cloud mining farm. And we are doing regular maintenance of the hardware in the data centers. Our main goal is to produce digital currency or cryptocurrency like bitcoin. We are using latest ASICs chips and mining rig, your bitcoin mining rig is already set up and running. It's so simple, setup your account, you can start mining your first ... Bitcoin-Qt ist ein Open-Source-Projekt und derzeit einer der sichersten Vertreter unter den Mining-Clients. Hier müssen Sie sich nicht um eventuelle Angriffe auf Ihr virtuelles Geld sorgen. Ebenfalls Open-Source und vertrauenswürdig ist Electrum.Das Tool punktet mit einer 2-Faktor-Authentifizierung, dem Support von Add-ons und der Möglichkeit, Ihre Keys jederzeit in andere Bitcoin-Clients ...

[index] [16786] [24632] [29607] [17059] [3299] [41148] [32167] [37933] [29077] [47487]

Bitmine.farm. (SCAM)

I had enough power at this location to build it out for 18, 6 GPU mining rigs. 13 of the machines are currently Mining Ethereum and the other three are mining Nexus. Crypto Clothing and Gear https ... Mining Bitcoin is as easy as installing the mining software on the PC you already own and clicking start. Anyone can do this and see the money start rolling ... No invest is required to start mining bitcoin from your home lap. Free Bitcoin Faucet! We have Bitcoin Faucet giving our users free bitcoin rewards every 10 minutes. We have No minimu withdraw ... Also bitmain.farm. how to work for earn btc via bitcoin miner Pakistan & Gpu rig mining eth ethereum zec zcash dash - Duration: 6:24. Bitcoin Miner Pakistan 279,802 views Final Set-up of 400 GPU mining Farm ! Complete and fully operational ! Time to start ASIC mining farm, Sharing a building process with you from next week. Ex...

#